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Re: Alocasia 'Black Magic'

  • Subject: Re: Alocasia 'Black Magic'
  • From: Ferenc Lengyel <feri.lengyel@gmail.com>
  • Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 08:13:00 +0200

Well, yes, in a florarium you do not need the plastic bag :) But let it get enough air movement. And I would use pure coconut peat. I found coconut peat (or chips? I guess they are the same) to have better water retaining capability then regular peat. I mean that peat can be very sloggy, but it can dry out quite quickly and thorroughly. And once it has dried out, it is not so easy to moisten it again. In a florarium drying is not an issue, but it is harder for seeds and tubers to breath in peat then in coconut chips (I think). In contrast, coconut chips do not get so sluggy if overwatered, they do dry out much slower than peat and it is much easier to moisten them when dried out. At least, it is my experience.
When your small tubers develop roots and begin to grow, put them into a loose soil mixture of course.
I always have fungus gnats, but I have no problem with them until the roots or tubers begin to rot. I am sure that they eat the fungus and rotting roots/tubers. I think that your problem was caused by fungi and rotting and not by the flies, but once the tubers begin to rot, the fly larvae make it worse. Again: just my opinion.
I wonder, what others think.
Good luck for the small tubers!!!
Ferenc
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