hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

[aroid-l] bracnhing petiols


Hiya All

There are leaves that SEEM to have branching petioles - Pentaphragama does
it as does Cyclanthaceae and a few other families - but what is actually
happening is the leaf blade 'forgets' (Wilbert please forgive the
teleology!) to develop along all the ribs and thus ending up with a leaf
that looks like it has a branching petiole.

Pete


----- Original Message -----
From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" <hetter@worldonline.nl>
To: <aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu>
Sent: Sunday, August 17, 2003 8:24 PM
Subject: Re: [aroid-l] How many leaves??


> Dear Dietmar & Margret,
>
> I did tell you about multiple leaves but NEVER about branching petioles.
> That just doesn't happen in this world unless it is a "Lusus Naturae" (a
> freak!).
>
> Cheerio,
> Wilbert
>
>
> > -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
> > Van: aroid-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
> > [mailto:aroid-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu]Namens Dietmar Kiehlmann
> > Verzonden: zondag 17 augustus 2003 13:23
> > Aan: aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> > Onderwerp: Re: [aroid-l] How many leaves??
> >
> >
> > Some weeks ago, we observed on one of our Am. bulbifer
> > that a second petiole emerged about 4 cm above the soil
> > from the existing petiole. Later, this second petiole broadened
> > downwards, as shown on the picture. The arrow indicates
> > the original emerging point. Hence branching of petioles is
> > possible within the genus Amorphophallus and, as Wilbert
> > wrote to us, is also known e.g. from A. paeoniifolius and
> > A. glossophyllus.
> >
> > Best regards
> > Margret & Dietmar Kiehlmann
>





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index