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Re: edible Anthuriums


-----Original Message-----
From: StellrJ@aol.com <StellrJ@aol.com>
To: ju-bo@msn.com <ju-bo@msn.com>
Date: Sunday, December 26, 1999 10:50 PM
Subject: Re: edible Anthuriums


In a message dated 12/25/1999 9:16:22 AM Pacific Standard Time,
ju-bo@email.msn.com writes:

> Dear Jason,
>  This probably was fruit from A. gracile (Rudge) Schott, a VERY common
>  epiphyte on the horizontal limbs of the HUGE Samaan Trees around the
U.W.I.
>  at St Agustine, N. Trinidad, I remember them well!
>  Cheers,

>That sounds right!  All I remembered was that the specific name meant
something to the effect of "small"  Gracile works.  This is a species with
lanceolate leaves and only a vestigial spathe.

Jason Hernandez
Naturalist-at-Large<

Dear Jason,
That`s the plant!   I have many memories of the large Samaan trees (to those
that do not know this tree, it is a HUGE legume, looks like an over-grown,
umbrella-shaped oak, the record specimen on T`dad had a trunk w/ a dia. of
over 12 ft., and covered an acre with the spread of branches!) on my Aunt`s
estate, their horizontal limbs just COVERED by the color red almost covering
the dark green leaves of this thickly growing species, the berries of ripe
fruits of this Anthurium being the cause!!
Cheers,
Julius










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