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Re: Symbiotic Anthurium

  • To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L <aroid-l@mobot.org>
  • Subject: Re: Symbiotic Anthurium
  • From: "Eduardo Goncalves" <edggon@hotmail.com>
  • Date: Thu, 6 Jul 2000 23:20:25 -0500 (CDT)

Hi Joe,

   Yes, there is a still unpublished species of Anthurium from Bahia
(eastern Brazil) there grows in bromeliad's tanks. It is pretty small and
slender and have a broad and pinkish spathe (somewhat similar in shape to
the spathe of A. scherzerianum). The plant is really incredible. We don't
know what attact the plants to the tanks, but it isn't too hard. Just for
information, in the Forests of Atlantic Coast in Brazil, it is easier to
find a Vriesea (or Canistrum, or Nidularium...) tank than to find a naked
trunk to grow! The trees are simply crowded with them! If this Anthurium
"preffer" wet places (and it seems to be the case), wherever it germinates,
it can grow to the nearest tank. Also in the Bahia state, there is a
Philodendron that is also specialized in bromeliad's tank: Philodendron
leal-costae! As you can note, the hardest thing around here is to stay away
from a bromeliad!
   So far as I know, Simon Mayo is describing this beauty, that I think it
will be named "A. bromelicola". Well, this is all I know about this
marvelous plant.

                                        Best wishes,

                                             Eduardo.


>From: Durightmm@aol.com
>Reply-To: aroid-l@mobot.org
>To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L <aroid-l@mobot.org>
>Subject: Symbiotic Anthurium
>Date: Thu, 6 Jul 2000 21:36:05 -0500 (CDT)
>
>Can anyone enlarge on news that in Brazil an ANTHURIUM was found living in
>a
>BROMELIAD?  It is small and  lives exclusively in a specific BROM.  If this
>is true it opens all kinds of doors.  Who is the distributor?  What
>attrracts
>it to this Brom species?    Croat should offer news of it at the Sept,
>meeting     Joe
>
>
>

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