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Re: Schismatoglottis species

  • Subject: Re: Schismatoglottis species
  • From: brian lee <lbmkjm@yahoo.com>
  • Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 13:35:52 -0700 (PDT)

Dear Peter,

Aloha.  Wow. Put me on your list for pre-publication of the book!  

I have a Schismatoglottis that I originally got from Roberto Burle-Marx's collection.  I suspect it is allied to the variable S. calyptrata...such as my poor knowledge of this group is. It seems to have the habit of clumping with the mother plant declining...I have not observed the flowering phenology in a careful fashion.  I will post a photo via my wife's email to see if you know this taxon.

I am impressed by the potential of Schismatoglottis...it obviously is an under appreciated group.  Any and all information will be welcomed. Do you know of sources for some of the species you list?  Are there any ecological information that will aid in planting these in the ground...ie: pH, soil type ,limestone under detritus, etc.?

I am grateful you are working on this genus.  Thank you for your wonderful response.

Aloha,

Leland



--- On Thu, 6/12/08, Peter Boyce <botanist@malesiana.com> wrote:

> From: Peter Boyce <botanist@malesiana.com>
> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Schismatoglottis species
> To: "Discussion of aroids" <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
> Date: Thursday, June 12, 2008, 1:24 PM
> Dear Leyland,
> 
> Sorry for the delay (again!) been a bit tied up with
> various non-gustatatory (but no less enjoyable)
> things here; mainly tryng to keep up with numerous
> flowerings in the
> research collection (which has just passed 2500 accessions)
> and the start of
> the repotting season (the 2500 accessions are each a
> minimum of 5
> plants...).
> 
> Schismatoglottis is, after Homalomena, the most speciose
> genus here in
> tropical Asia; in Sarawak alone there are at least 100
> species with
> somewhere over 50% yet to be given a scientific name. At
> the moment there
> are only a few species in cultivation outside specialist
> and botanical
> garden collections; many of those (and there are not many)
> on the web away
> from the IAS site are misnamed.
> Before I left MT late last year I was very actively
> involved with
> introducing Schsmats into tc for assessment as
> horticultural subjects. The
> results of some of these are now just finding their way
> onto the market and
> will be, all being well, available in the not too distant
> future.
> 
> We are now working on the systematics and evolution of the
> genus and some of
> the related satellites and have as a result an extensive
> collection of ca.
> 60+ spp.; most of these are attractive, some are
> outstandingly so.
> 
> In terms of growth habit Schismatoglottis fall into two
> broad groups. There are species with a creeping underground
> rhizome-like stem and form dense to somewhat diffuse
> colonies.
> This group includes the very variable (as currently
> defined) S. calyptrata, S. motleyana, S. wongii, S.
> wallichi. These species tend to have leaf laminae with
> cordate to rounded bases and often very attractive
> variagation. The primary disadvantage of these colonial
> species is that they are difficult to maintain in small
> pots as after flowering each shoot dies and is replecd by
> one or usually more shoots from  near the base of the
> rhizome and this , combined with the long distance that he
> rhizomes spread mean that most of the çalyptrata
> group'need at least a cut-down 30 gallon trashcan to
> enable them to form multiple shoots. The best way of
> growing them in in  raised beds or, if the climate allows,
> but are much better in open ground under medium shade.
> 
> The species forming tufts with a single or a few upright
> stems are probably, as ornamenals, the most important group
> in that they grown somewhat in the manner of Alocasia and
> are thus much moe easily managed in small to medium pots.
> This group actually contains several taxonomic units,
> including the 'asperata group', the 'multiflora
> group', 'rupestris group', etc. Many are
> outstanding onamentals although at the moment there are
> very few in cultivaion.
> 
> If I were asked to select a few for their outstanding
> leaves I would go for:
> 
> S. asperata (esp, the forms with the backs of the leaf and
> petiole deep red
> and the upper leaf surface deep green with three shades of
> green and silver
> variegaion)
> 
> S. motleyana or S. wongii in the three or four colour
> variegation forms.
> 
> S. colocasioides with its plum-purple warty petioles and
> grey on green
> banded leaves.
> 
> S. trivitatta, especially forms with longitudinal ragged
> zones of silver and
> a silver mid-rib.
> 
> S. gamoandra with rosettes off stiff pewter and steel
> banded leaves with raised checker-board venation.
> 
> S. acuminatissima 'Lavallei' with upright stems and
> leaves deep plum-purple beneath and deep geen with grey and
> two shades of green above. This is in trade as Homalomena
> 'Purple Sword'
> 
> and... if space allows, S. cornei, a a species with
> succulent grey-green leaves that can reach over 3 m tall
> and produces clusters on inflorescences resembling white
> and jave walking sticks...
> 
> If this post recives some interest I will post some images
> of these and a few others.
> 
> 
> Peter
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "brian lee" <lbmkjm@yahoo.com>
> To: "Discussion of aroids"
> <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
> Sent: Tuesday, June 10, 2008 2:50 AM
> Subject: [Aroid-l] Schismatoglottis species
> 
> 
> > Dear Peter,
> >
> > Aloha and mahalo for this additional information.  I
> can understand the
> > delay... tuak and wild boar...eat and drink until you
> sleep.
> >
> > I love this sort of information, root glues and stem
> disarticulations.
> > This is changing the subject, but, can you start a new
> thread on
> > Schismatoglottis? I do not know much about the species
> listed, but it is
> > long and I have seen only a few in cultivation.  Could
> you educate us on
> > the more ornamental species in this genus?  At least
> the species you
> > encounter?
> >
> > Aloha,
> >
> > Leland
> >
> >
> > --- On Sun, 6/8/08, Peter Boyce
> <botanist@malesiana.com> wrote:
> >
> >> From: Peter Boyce <botanist@malesiana.com>
> >> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] an apolgy if it is order
> >> To: "Discussion of aroids"
> <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
> >> Date: Sunday, June 8, 2008, 9:35 PM
> >> Hi Leyland,
> >>
> >> Sorry for the delay in replying; just been the big
> Gawai
> >> holidays here so a
> >> bit tied up with drinking tuak and eating wild
> boar.
> >>
> >> Root glue occurs in the feeding roots all Asian
> genera (but
> >> not all the
> >> species of each genus) of the Monstereae (e.g.,
> Amydrium,
> >> Rhaphidophora,
> >> Scindapsus & Epipremnum), in Anadendreae
> (Anadendrum
> >> only) and in Pothos and
> >> Pedicellarum of Potheae. It is visible as a cap of
> >> 'gel' on the active root
> >> tip. The most striking 'caps' are found in
> the
> >> Hookeri complex of
> >> Rhaphidophora (R. hookeri, foraminifera, puberula,
> >> todayensis) in which not
> >> only do the active tips of the feeder roots have a
> very
> >> substantial cap but
> >> the climbing roots arise in masses along the stem
> and
> >> produce copious
> >> quantities of gel/slime that not only glues the
> roots to
> >> the climbing
> >> surface but also seems to provide an ideal
> environment for
> >> additional root
> >> development such that pulling one of these from
> the tree
> >> often removes a
> >> fair proportion of the adjacent bark.
> >>
> >> Shoot disarticulation so far is found in the Asian
> >> rheophytic genera. I have
> >> also observed (in cultivation) the same in W
> Africa
> >> rheophytic Anubias but I
> >> have never been to W Africa and so cannot say
> whether other
> >> African
> >> rheophtyes (Nephthytis, some Cercestis) have
> >> disarticulation mechanics.
> >>
> >> Very best
> >>
> >> Pete
> >>
> >> ----- Original Message ----- 
> >> From: "brian lee"
> <lbmkjm@yahoo.com>
> >> To: "Discussion of aroids"
> >> <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
> >> Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2008 5:18 PM
> >> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] an apolgy if it is order
> >>
> >>
> >> > Dear Peter,
> >> >
> >> > Aloha.  Thank you for answering Steve's
> inquiry
> >> with
> >> > this interesting set of observations....do
> you know of
> >> > root glues or stem disarticulations in other
> plant
> >> > genera?  What other botanical life history
> secrets can
> >> > you share?
> >> >
> >> > Aloha,
> >> >
> >> > Leland
> >> >
> >> > --- Peter Boyce
> <botanist@malesiana.com> wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> Hi Steve,
> >> >>
> >> >> The root tip thing is very interesting.
> While up
> >> at
> >> >> Batang Ai last week took some time to
> look closely
> >> >> at a very common species of Piptospatha
> and
> >> realized
> >> >> that the active root tip was always
> coated in cap
> >> of
> >> >> viscous gel; looking at root development
> it dawned
> >> >> on me that the gel was acting as an
> adhesive; as
> >> the
> >> >> root progressed across the rock the gel
> cap laid
> >> >> down a thin film, much the same as a slug
> or snail
> >> >> does, and the developing root hairs bound
> into
> >> this,
> >> >> gluing the root to the rock to the extent
> that
> >> >> attempts to remove older portions the
> root
> >> actually
> >> >> removed fragments of the rock (shale).
> >> >>
> >> >> The shoot tip thing is that the active
> shoot is
> >> >> attached to the older part of the stem by
> a line
> >> of
> >> >> weakness that functions as a point of
> potential
> >> >> disarticulation. When the river flow
> becomes to
> >> >> great such that the drag on the leafy
> portion has
> >> >> the potential to dislodge the entire
> plant, the
> >> >> leafy shoot breaks at the point of
> weakness and
> >> thus
> >> >> by sacrificing the active shoot/s the
> plan is able
> >> >> to reduce drag and thus prevent total
> >> dislodgement.
> >> >> The stumps remaining readily re-sprout,
> often
> >> >> forming multi-headed plants. Aside from
> >> 'saving' the
> >> >> mother plant the 'lost' active
> shoot tips
> >> frequently
> >> >> end up in a suitable environment for
> >> >> re-establishment and thus act as
> dispersal units.
> >> >> Another interesting aspect of this
> process is that
> >> >> the disarticulation point 'moves'
> with the
> >> extension
> >> >> of the active shoot and thus only the
> same size
> >> >> piece of active shoot is shed each time.
> >> >>
> >> >> Very best
> >> >>
> >> >> Pete
> >> >>   ----- Original Message ----- 
> >> >>   From: ExoticRainforest
> >> >>   To: Discussion of aroids
> >> >>   Sent: Monday, June 02, 2008 7:19 PM
> >> >>   Subject: [Aroid-l] an apolgy if it is
> order
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>   Pete, this message from you is more
> valuable
> >> than
> >> >> I can make clear. I have several mentors
> who are
> >> my
> >> >> honest-to-goodness heroes and friends. 
> And I hope
> >> >> you know you are one.  Tom, Simon,
> Eduardo,
> >> >> Alistair, Julius, Leland and many others,
> a list
> >> too
> >> >> long to mention, help me all the time! 
> My goal
> >> has
> >> >> been only to self-educate myself and to
> try to
> >> share
> >> >> what I learn in a way anyone interested
> in aroids
> >> >> can utilize.  I am a writer who has been
> putting
> >> >> words on paper for over 30 years.  But
> without
> >> >> accurate sources there is nothing to
> write!
> >> >>
> >> >>   You have answered my questions many,
> many times
> >> >> and always help to make what I'm
> trying to
> >> >> understand clear.  And that is at least
> in part
> >> the
> >> >> reason I quote all of you rather than
> trying to
> >> put
> >> >> what you teach in my own words.  As a
> >> non-scientist
> >> >> my words are useless, but your words have
> value!
> >> >>
> >> >>   So thanks for your kindness and your
> continued
> >> >> help.  With the same thanks to all the
> >> professionals
> >> >> who teach me something new in their
> journals and
> >> >> emails on virtually a daily basis.  If I
> could
> >> offer
> >> >> advice to anyone who is interested in
> aroids it
> >> >> would be to build a library of good
> scientific
> >> >> material on the genus.  In the beginning
> the
> >> reading
> >> >> is difficult, but I time you will begin
> to
> >> >> understand the scientific terms and all
> those
> >> >> questions become clear answers.
> >> >>
> >> >>   Now, a big request!  Tell us about
> "the way
> >> roots
> >> >> glue themselves to rocks and how the
> shoot tips of
> >> a
> >> >> rheophytes resist water flow in
> spate."  You
> >> just
> >> >> opened up a new file in my brain and I
> want to
> >> know!
> >> >>
> >> >>   Steve
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>     Steve,
> >> >>
> >> >>     I live in a country where we
> constantly
> >> struggle
> >> >> to get our students to read..... believe
> me...you
> >> >> can NEVER read too much. I have worked
> with aroids
> >> >> in one way or another for 30+ years;
> >> professionally
> >> >> for 20+ years... I read about aroids, any
> aroids,
> >> >> every day. And every day I learn
> something
> >> >> new...this week so far I have learned
> something
> >> new
> >> >> about pollination, the way roots glue
> themselves
> >> to
> >> >> rocks and how the shoot tips of a
> rheophytes
> >> resist
> >> >> water flow in spate. Tom, who has just
> tuned 70,
> >> has
> >> >> worked on aroids for over 40 years... he
> reads
> >> every
> >> >> day... Josef has worked on aroids nerly
> 50
> >> years...
> >> >> he reads every day... and I would bet
> that they
> >> too
> >> >> are constantly learning new things.
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >
> >>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>  
> _______________________________________________
> >> >>   Aroid-L mailing list
> >> >>   Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
> >> >>
> >> http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
> >> >> >
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> >> Aroid-L mailing list
> >> >> Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
> >> >>
> http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> _______________________________________________
> >> > Aroid-L mailing list
> >> > Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
> >> >
> http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> _______________________________________________
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> >> http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
> >
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> >
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