hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Aroids growing better in water?

  • Subject: Re: Aroids growing better in water?
  • From: StellrJ@aol.com
  • Date: Wed, 29 May 2002 14:21:24 -0500 (CDT)

In a message dated 05/28/2002 9:11:15 PM Pacific Daylight Time, roniles@eircom.net writes:


So - Questions:-


Ron has posed some excellent questions.  For my part, I doubt the answers are known.  No doubt many if not all these questions will require specific experiments to find the answers.  Horticulture is not my field, so I would not know how to set up such experiments, but it seems to me tissue culture can play an important part, by producing numerous specimens of a single species or cultivar, which could then be tested with different variables.  Also, Ron is absolutely correct that ecological observations in the wild are critical: light levels, soils, degree of wetness, etc.  Is it not true that the majority of tropical flora (Aroid or otherwise) known to science, are known only by a name and the most general natural history information?  A few select taxa have been studied for pollination biology and other details, and of course the most economically important ones are known in detail, but the majority are but names and brief notes, are they not?&n! bsp; But conducting such research requires money, and research grants are in limited supply.  So...who has ideas?

Jason Hernandez
Naturalist-at-Large




 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index