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Helicodiceros Flowering

  • Subject: Helicodiceros Flowering
  • From: James Waddick <jwaddick@kc.rr.com>
  • Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 08:16:57 -0500


I’ve grown Helicodiceros musciverous in my Kansas City garden (USDA Zone 5/6) for many years. At first I was kind of surprised to see it return regularly even after winter lows of 0F and less. And I now have 4 blooming plants and other smaller plants. 

I have a question. Is it common for this species to produce two flowering heads from a single tuber?  One plant produced a flower at the regular season and then about 2 weeks later a second bloom stem appeared and flowered from the same head of foliage. 

I rarely get two flowers in the correct timing sequence to get fertile seeds, but this year had 5 flowers from 4 flowering plants. 

Appreciate any thoughts about the rarity of this happening. Best Jim W. 

Dr. James Waddick
8871 NW Brostrom Rd
Kansas City, MO 64152-2711
Phone     816-746-1949

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