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RE: experiments on amorphophallus bulbs

  • To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L <aroid-l@mobot.org>
  • Subject: RE: experiments on amorphophallus bulbs
  • From: "newton" <newton@coiinc.com>
  • Date: Sun, 29 Oct 2000 18:47:22 -0600 (CST)

This past season, I fed one of my largest Am. Konjac tubers intermittently.
It had bloomed, rested and sent up a good leaf for the balance of the summer
and just died back about 3 weeks ago.
The tuber was planted in a mixture of commercial potting soil and leaf
compost. The soil stayed moist but was well drained.
Upon digging for the tubers this past week, I did not find the expected
rhizome connected "new" tubers. Rather, there were numerous small, distorted
tubers in groups attached directly to the parent tuber in clusters.
These small groups of tubers appeared grouped much like clusters of tuberosa
bulbs.
Any idea what happened? Do I need to treat for something?
Lost in Illinois

Tim McNinch







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