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Re: Anthurium seeds

I saw the listing back this morning.  I checked the regular sources and didn't see it was taken from anyone I can report it to so what upset me is not involved in the possible sale of whatever seeds she may, or may not have.  Personally, since the stories don't add up and due to the rarity of at least one plant offered, I doubt the seeds even existed.  But I have no way of knowing that for certain.  And your comment about a bad seller in Ankara adds to the doubt.  But still, I have no way of knowing if this person is or is not selling what she offers.  There's not much I, or others, can do.  All I can hope is whomever buys the seeds receives what they pay for.  The starting price has been increased dramatically.  So the best I can say is "Buyer Beware". 
I've received one private email calling me some unkind names for even getting involved.  Seems not everyone thinks stealing photos is a bad thing.  They called it "trivial".  But as a retired commercial photographer, it really ticks me off! 
Thanks for the comments.
Steve Lucas
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2007 12:38 AM
Subject: [Aroid-l] Anthurium seeds

Steve, Dan, et al,
I've stayed out of the discussions as I get rather heated about eBay sales occasionally and try to keep a level head on discussing it. But, I would like to add a few cents here. Since I am a regular eBay seller, there are a few things I would like to point out.
Let me just first day that I am not advocating stealing photos. Posting web links to others web sites is always the best way to go and a society or authority list (like Dr. Croats and others) always adds validity to references. Taking someone else's photos from the web without permission should be reason for immediate termination from eBay or other similar auction houses.
There is a ladybotany listing still there for A. superbum seeds:
The seller is listed as being in Ankara. The same location as an unscrupulous seller earlier this year trying to sell unavailable Clivia seeds. She/He said that they have 200 Clivia mirabilis seeds for sale. Well, those on the Clivia list brought it up and well, there really hasn't been that amount of seeds for sale this year. It is a new species, government regulations, private farmers had crop failures, etc. Anyway, the auctions were ended but people who were contacted by the seller say that the seed was re-listed on eBay as grass seed for $1 each. Hello, who would be so stupid?????
Anyway, I digress. The point to this soliloquy being all the rare seeds that I and others sell sometimes go to those who really don't know what they are buying or getting themselves into. Dan and I have emailed about this. I can't tell you how many dollars have padded my pockets for rare seeds that I would like to see fall into someone's hands who knows what they are doing. But, no. They go to Susie in Middle America who has a few dollars to spend and wants something different than her spider plant. So, off it goes, she gets a little seedling that grows and grows. All that she has is a name that was sent with the seed (or plant or seedling). Ignorant of all the worlds around her and people who grow similar things, she has this plant which after several years and loving care, is a mature specimen and producing seeds. She doesn't know that seeds from it aren't the same as what she got but she thought, maybe someone else out there might want one and she can pass it on for a $1 or two, get some extra cash for some new pots.
I can't tell you how many rare plants I haev found lurking in the most unlikely locations for what ever reason they were there. I have a client that isn't a plant person, she loves flowers though. She has even told me that she would rather spend $100 on impatiens than $10 on a nice plant. And yet, her house has more rare plants than many public gardens. Simply because they came with the house. I've treatened to sue her if she touches any of them and she just laughs and doesn't ask me to come back for a year or so.
Steve, I am on your side about stolen photos, hands down and ebay should back you up. But, let's not doubt the ignorance of suppliers until they are proven wrong. They might just be a little misguided.

John Ingram in Camarillo, CA, between Santa Barbara and L.A.
Membership Director, North American Clivia Society
www.floralarchitecture.com "Your Clivia Connection"
310.709.1613 (cell, west coast time, please call accordingly. Thank you)

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