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Re: [aroid-l] P. rubrinervum growth habit

  • Subject: Re: [aroid-l] P. rubrinervum growth habit
  • From: Neil Crafter golfstra@senet.com.au
  • Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2003 09:46:29 +0930

Leslie
true p.saxicolum is a member of the same subgroup as P.bipinnatifdum, subgroup "Meconostigma", in other words it is 'self-header", or tree type philodendron. I'd be interested to see whether your seedlings are exhibiting this growth habit. If not, they are unlikely to be true P.saxicolum.
Live plant shipments to Australia are prohibited unless you have an import permit and access to a quarantine registered glasshouse. Easier to import seeds.
cheers
Neil Crafter
Adelaide, Australia
On Friday, September 19, 2003, at 10:50 PM, Leslie R. wrote:

I haven't found any other name this plant goes by. The P. rubrinervum seedlings are in 4-inch pots now and growing quickly. I'm anxious to see some mature leaves, then perhaps they can be identified under another name. In general, the juvenile leaves are broad heart-shaped and fairly deeply-veined. They are quick to grow out ariel roots. Their growth habit is very similar to saxicolum, though the rubrinervum is a larger, sturdier plant overall. I don't have any more saxicolum seeds, but I will have a few plants which I started from seed this spring which will need homes sometime this fall probably, if I think they are suitable in size to ship before winter. Of course, you being in Australia, this doesn't help. Leslie RuleMissouri

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