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RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1735 - 4 msgs

  • Subject: [cg] RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1735 - 4 msgs
  • From: "George Johnson" <gjohnson@jfscolumbus.org>
  • Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2004 13:49:08 -0500
  • Importance: Normal

I find the format unwieldy and would like to unsubscribe and I haven't even
been able to accomplish that!  Help!

-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 1:00 PM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1735 - 4 msgs



Send community_garden mailing list submissions to
	community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the web, visit
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When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of community_garden digest..."


Today's Topics:

  1. Today's the deadline (Laura Berman)
  2. RE: FEC changing the rules on non-profit political activity (lisa
vandyke)
  3. South African RN /Gardener Gets Recognized (adam36055@aol.com)
  4. Boston: ACGA Treasurer Betsy Johnson Comes Up Roses.
(adam36055@aol.com)

--__--__--

Message: 1
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 15:02:38 -0500
From: Laura Berman <laura@foodshare.net>
To: ACGA listserve <community_garden@mallorn.com>
Subject: [cg] Today's the deadline

Hi Everyone,
Just a reminder that today is the deadline for submitting your proposal to
make a presentation at this year's ACGA conference in Toronto Oct 1-3, 2004.
If you have been thinking about it but just haven't gotten it together to do
anything about it, you still have time but the clock is ticking...

Submission forms can be downloaded at
<http://www.communitygarden.org/conf/index.html#call>

Cheers,
Laura


-----
Laura Berman
FoodShare Toronto
416-392-6654

@    @   @   @   @
\|/  \|/  \|/  \|/  \|/
""""""""""""""""""""""

October 1-3, 2004--Toronto:
"Gardens of Diversity: Growing Across Cultures"
The 25th Anniversary of the
American Community Gardening Association
www.communitygarden.org




--__--__--

Message: 2
From: "lisa vandyke" <vandykelisa@hotmail.com>
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 14:56:15 -0600
Subject: [cg] RE: FEC changing the rules on non-profit political activity

<html><div style='background-color:'><DIV class=RTE>
<P><BR><BR></P></DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>My take on this is that the regulation could be interpreted very
loosely. I'm all for campaign finance reform, but this will impact any type
of non-profit criticisizing policy or politicians;&nbsp;a faith-based group
organizing&nbsp;for policy, an environmental group working to educate the
public about a potentially critical vote, etc. I don't think it matters
where you stand in the spectrum of political voices, this&nbsp;appears
to&nbsp;be in clear violation of Free Speech. I am concerned that large
corps. have such an enormous influence in govt., but when non-profits speak
up they will be silenced. Thanks for bringing this up.</DIV>
<DIV>Lisa in Mpls.</DIV></div><br clear=all><hr> <a
href="http://g.msn.com/8HMAENUS/2746??PS=";>All the action. All the drama.
Get NCAA hoops coverage at MSN Sports by ESPN.</a> </html>


--__--__--

Message: 3
From: Adam36055@aol.com
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 16:26:37 EST
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
CC: cybergardens@treebranch.com,
ARKANSAS_FOOD_SECURITY_NETWORK@LISTS.WHATHELPS.COM
Subject: [cg] South African RN /Gardener Gets Recognized


--part1_c0.8e5377d.2d9c918d_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Friends,

I was particularly touched by the story of Sister Miriam Modiakgotla (54) of
the Republic of South Africa, because  her AIDS, food security ( community
gardening!), poverty alleviation and collections  to bury the epidemic's
dead
were so  similar in scope to that of my late wife, Allegra Benveniste
Honigman,
RN,(53)  in Hell's Kitchen.

There is something special about professional registered nurses.


Unlike most physicians ( albeit, the Bach playing Dr. Albert Schweitzers DO
come by once a hundred years)  nurses regularly manage to look beyond their
clinics and hospitals and see their duty in service to the patient and her
community as a whole.

In salute to nurses, who "get" community gardening as part of the unbroken
fabric of caring for community.

Adam Honigman,
Volunteer,
 Clinton Community Garden

Olifantsfontein Nurse Gets Recognition

BuaNews (Pretoria)
NEWS
March 31, 2004
Posted to the web March 31, 2004

By Jabulani Tshindane
Pretoria
Hard work and dedication to community development has earned a professional
nurse recognition by those she has been serving throughout her career since
1969.
Sister Miriam Modiakgotla (54) has been a pillar of strength to the
community
of Olifantsfontein, on the East Rand.
In her career, she has introduced support groups for people living with HIV
and AIDS, ensured that people benefit from poverty alleviation programmes
such
as gardening, feeding schemes and ensured that people too poor to bury their
loved one's do so in dignity.
"I do this for the love of my people and would continue to serve those in
need of my help, during my spare time I would move around the community to
make
sure that people in the neighbourhood go to bed with something to eat," she
explained.
Sister Modiakgotla is a nurse at Olifantsfontein clinic and specialises in
treating TB patients, making sure that patients complete their course to
avoid
developing multi-drug resistant TB which is hard and much more expensive to
treat.
For these and other reasons, the Gauteng Health MEC Gwen Ramokgopa honoured
her at a fully packed community hall yesterday.
Speaking at the ceremony, Dr Ramokgopa said the Gauteng government was
trying
to establish partnerships with NGOs to provide primary health care to the
people.
She mentioned that Sasko Bakery had also recognised Sister Modiakgotla and
offered to provide bread daily to support her feeding scheme.
The MEC said by honouring the health worker the provincial government was
showing it would honour the exceptional services done by other health
workers as
well.
"The Gauteng government would continue to congratulate the health workers,
so
to inspire them to achieve marvelous work and attract more people to the
health workers field."
Dr Ramokgopa urged nurses to work together with government and be serious
like Sister Madiakgotla.
Sister Modiakgotla received the Cecilia Makiwane Nursing Award last year and
today, she will walk away with prize money as part of the Gauteng health
department's ten years of freedom celebrations.


--part1_c0.8e5377d.2d9c918d_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><HTML><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT
BA=
CK=3D"#ffffff" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 PTSIZE=3D10
FAMI=
LY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Friends, <BR>
<BR>
I was particularly touched by the story of Sister Miriam Modiakgotla (54)
of=
 the Republic of South Africa, because&nbsp; her AIDS, food security (
commu=
nity gardening!), poverty alleviation and collections&nbsp; to bury the
epid=
emic's dead&nbsp; were so&nbsp; similar in scope to that of my late wife,
Al=
legra Benveniste Honigman, RN,(53)&nbsp; in Hell's Kitchen. <BR>
<BR>
There is something special about professional registered nurses. <BR>
<BR>
Unlike most physicians ( albeit, the Bach playing Dr. Albert Schweitzers
DO=20=
come by once a hundred years)&nbsp; nurses regularly manage to look beyond
t=
heir clinics and hospitals and see their duty in service to the patient
and=20=
her community as a whole. <BR>
<BR>
In salute to nurses, who "get" community gardening as part of the unbroken
f=
abric of caring for community. <BR>
<BR>
Adam Honigman, <BR>
Volunteer, <BR>
 <A HREF=3D"http://www.clintoncommunitygarden.org/";>Clinton Community
Garden=
</A>&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>
Olifantsfontein Nurse Gets Recognition <BR>
<BR>
BuaNews (Pretoria) <BR>
NEWS<BR>
March 31, 2004 <BR>
Posted to the web March 31, 2004 <BR>
<BR>
By Jabulani Tshindane<BR>
Pretoria <BR>
Hard work and dedication to community development has earned a
professional=20=
nurse recognition by those she has been serving throughout her career
since=20=
1969. <BR>
Sister Miriam Modiakgotla (54) has been a pillar of strength to the
communit=
y of Olifantsfontein, on the East Rand. <BR>
In her career, she has introduced support groups for people living with
HIV=20=
and AIDS, ensured that people benefit from poverty alleviation programmes
su=
ch as gardening, feeding schemes and ensured that people too poor to bury
th=
eir loved one's do so in dignity. <BR>
"I do this for the love of my people and would continue to serve those in
ne=
ed of my help, during my spare time I would move around the community to
mak=
e sure that people in the neighbourhood go to bed with something to eat,"
sh=
e explained. <BR>
Sister Modiakgotla is a nurse at Olifantsfontein clinic and specialises in
t=
reating TB patients, making sure that patients complete their course to
avoi=
d developing multi-drug resistant TB which is hard and much more expensive
t=
o treat. <BR>
For these and other reasons, the Gauteng Health MEC Gwen Ramokgopa
honoured=20=
her at a fully packed community hall yesterday. <BR>
Speaking at the ceremony, Dr Ramokgopa said the Gauteng government was
tryin=
g to establish partnerships with NGOs to provide primary health care to
the=20=
people. <BR>
She mentioned that Sasko Bakery had also recognised Sister Modiakgotla and
o=
ffered to provide bread daily to support her feeding scheme. <BR>
The MEC said by honouring the health worker the provincial government was
sh=
owing it would honour the exceptional services done by other health
workers=20=
as well. <BR>
"The Gauteng government would continue to congratulate the health workers,
s=
o to inspire them to achieve marvelous work and attract more people to the
h=
ealth workers field." <BR>
Dr Ramokgopa urged nurses to work together with government and be serious
li=
ke Sister Madiakgotla. <BR>
Sister Modiakgotla received the Cecilia Makiwane Nursing Award last year
and=
 today, she will walk away with prize money as part of the Gauteng health
de=
partment's ten years of freedom celebrations.<BR>
<BR>
</FONT></HTML>
--part1_c0.8e5377d.2d9c918d_boundary--


--__--__--

Message: 4
From: Adam36055@aol.com
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2004 12:57:16 EST
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
CC: betsy@chefscollaborative.org
Subject: [cg] Boston: ACGA Treasurer Betsy Johnson Comes Up Roses.


--part1_65.25dcc6a8.2d9db1fc_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


Thursday, April 01, 2004


COMING UP ROSES
Tips and tricks for urban gardening
BY NINA MACLAUGHLIN
Boston Phoenix


The rose gardeners only came out at night. A few years back, as Boston
legend
has it, the city needed to cut costs. Lists of expendable expenses were
drawn
up, and the roses - and their maintenance - in the Boston Public Garden were
pruned from the budget. The city decided that roses and the effort to
maintain
them were something Boston could do without. Better than slashing teachers
or
art programs, you might think. Who needs a few flower bushes?

But a gaggle of gardeners felt otherwise. This group of rose-loving Boston
beautifiers banded together and agreed to maintain the roses themselves -
secretly, silently, as volunteers - in order to keep the pride of the Public
Garden
on display. Once a week during the summer, a little after dusk, when most of
the commuters had already passed by and most of the tourists were out to
dinner, the gardeners tended to the roses. Picture men and women in pink and
rose-red camouflage, armed with pruning shears and trowels, ducking and
dashing from
bush to bush. This group of guerrilla gardeners understood, it seems, the
power of plants.

Because when tourists from Japan and Germany visit Boston, when they amble
around with their digital cameras and their guidebooks, they ooh and ahh as
they
walk through the Public Garden. They take pictures. "What a beautiful city,"
they say to their friends at home. And maybe they're not thinking of the
roses
in particular, but the flowers certainly add to the overall effect. More
tourists come. They go out to dinner and stay in hotels and go to museums
and on
Duck Tours, and Boston wins.

Closer to home, when we walk through the gardens with frazzled post-work
brains or on hazy summer afternoons, and we see the care and color, it makes
us
feel better, too. We take pride in Boston, and we want to keep it blooming.
The
volunteer rose brigade knew this, and their stealth tending is testament to
the power and pleasure flowers can bring to a city.

Urban gardening - planting, growing, and harvesting something in a limited
space in the city - is an art form, but you don't have to be a rogue rose
warrior to have access to a plot. Across Boston, there are more than 250
community
gardens, areas open to the public for individuals to claim a plot of land to
grow beets or begonias, peonies, pansies, or potatoes. And whether you live
in
Brighton or Beacon Hill, Allston or Roxbury, chances are there's a community
garden nearby where you can start growing.

The positive results from these gardens range from the personal to the
public. "I could go on and on about the benefits of these community
programs," says
Betsy Johnson, treasurer of the American Community Gardening Association and
executive director of Chefs Collaborative, a national network of people in
the
food community who promote sustainable cuisine and responsible food-industry
practices. "You can put gardening in the mental-health category," she says.
"It's a way to enjoy nature, have a place that's yours, a reason to get out
and
be away from things." Not to mention the way it beautifies a neighborhood,
she
adds.

For a list of community gardens, look to the Boston Natural Areas Network
(BNAN) Web site, http://www.bostonnatural.org/, which breaks them down by
neighborhood. "Each community garden is managed on an individual basis, and
each
garden has a main contact," Johnson explains. BNAN maintains a list of
contacts
for each garden. To obtain a plot, call BNAN, get the information for the
contact person at the garden you want to be a part of, and get in touch with
that
person. He or she will tell you whether there's a waiting list or not, and
whether the garden can provide a plot.

Each garden has its own set of rules and regulations. In cities like Chicago
and Seattle, community gardens are run by a single state agency. Not here.
The
way the gardens are run "reflects the unique history of each community
garden," says Jo Ann Whitehead, a garden educator at BNAN. "Every one has
its own
story. That there's no one way of doing things reflects that." Here,
management
depends on volunteer gardeners. They collect dues, maintain waiting lists,
run
spring and fall meetings. Price per plot depends on water. "Each garden has
to figure out how much it needs to charge in order to pay for the water,"
says
Johnson. Renting a plot for the summer costs anywhere from about $10 to $50.

Like the rules of the gardens, what grows in each varies from neighborhood
to
neighborhood. "There's a large preponderance of vegetable-growing," says
Johnson, but some community gardens, like the Fenway Victory Gardens - one
of the
most visible and well-known - have more flowers than vegetables, due to
vandalism and a large rat population. The garden at the Boston Nature
Center, on the
other hand, one of the biggest in the city with about 300 plots, has nothing
but vegetables. "They just evolve this way," says Johnson.

"It's not like gardening in your own back yard," says Whitehead. "Some
people
think in terms of 'it's my plot now,' but it really is a public space, and
it
won't survive without the community." And it's precisely that idea that
makes
community gardens so special, says Johnson. "That's part of the beauty of
community gardens. Everyone's right there."

But plenty of people prefer the privacy of their own back deck, front porch,
or fire escape, and it's possible to do a lot of planting in a little space.
"Gardening is more of a challenge for a person in the city," says Mark
Cutler,
an operations manager at Mahoney's Garden Center, in Cambridge, who moved
from
a Maine home with apple trees in his yard to a North End apartment with a
tiny fire escape. But Cutler made his space work by cultivating some dwarfed
evergreens and "beautiful, albeit small" pots. "Not to overuse the phrase,"
he
says, "but it's Zen-like. It's one of the most calming things to go out
there at
the end of the day and have a drink and enjoy the sunset."

To create your own city garden, there are a few basic factors to consider,
says Cutler. "Know your light conditions," because light determines what
kinds
of plants will thrive. "Is there direct sun or is the space in the shade?"
Then
you have to decide if you want your mini-garden to be a one-season affair,
or
if you want something that's year-round. "If you just want some summer
color," Cutler says, you have a wide variety of flower and container
options: "You
can use a boot as long as it holds soil," he says.

For the amateur gardener, someone who might not have 20 minutes every
evening
to trim and tend and weed and water, Cutler suggests some nearly fail-proof
plants. "It's New England, and let's face it, you can't go wrong with
geraniums." And, surprisingly, roses aren't something you need to fuss over:
"There are
varieties that will take care of themselves." When it comes to vegetables,
almost all of which need bright light, tomatoes and basil are the most
popular
options. Mahoney's carries more than 80 varieties of tomatoes alone. "You
can
get a compact 'patio' tomato" that's meant to be small, Cutler says. Veggies
to
watch out for if you're dealing with cramped conditions are zucchini and
squash, which tend to run.

Ornamental grasses, which can grow up to eight feet, prove a popular choice.
More exotic and unusual options include Bismark palms, "with big, dramatic,
silver-blue, hand-shaped" leaves, or jasmine, which flowers all summer.
Cutler
recommends hibiscus, morning glories, and mandevilla vines. What you choose
also depends on whether you're into instant gratification ("Start with a
six-foot
tree") or willing to test your patience ("Start real small").

And now's the time to start planning for the summer. Cutler recommends
coming
into the Garden Center or other nursery not only with an idea of what your
light conditions are, but also with thoughts about how you want to fill the
space you have. Like any other trend, flowers go in and out of style. "What
was
hot a few years ago, people don't want to look at now," Cutler says. Look
around. See what you like. And read through gardening books. "Now, when
everything's
put to bed, is the time to be the imaginative gardener," says Cutler.

If your thumb needs some help getting green, the Cambridge Center for Adult
Education offers several gardening classes. "Container Gardening for the
Horticulturally Challenged," for example, takes place on May 16 and costs
$63.

On the other hand, if you've got no interest in growing your own anything,
Boston's got acres of gardens to explore, like the Arnold Arboretum, the
Mount
Auburn Cemetery - America's first garden cemetery - and, of course, the
Boston
Public Garden, roses and all.

Nina MacLaughlin can be reached at nmaclaughlin@phx.com .










  Thursday, April 01, 2004





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    E-Mail This Article to a Friend

Coming up roses
Tips and tricks for urban gardening
BY NINA MACLAUGHLIN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
--




----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
--

Where to go for the green

o Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, (617) 524-1718;
http://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/.

o Boston Natural Areas Network, http://www.bostonnatural.org/.

o Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan, (617) 983-8500;
http://www.massaudubon.org/Nature_Connection/Sanctuaries/Boston/index.php.

o Boston Public Garden, Charles Street, Boston, (617) 635-7383.

o Cambridge Center for Adult Education, 56 Brattle Street, Cambridge, (617)
547-6789; http://www.ccae.org./

o Fenway Victory Gardens, the Fens, Boston;
http://www.fenwayvictorygardens.com/.

o Mahoney's Garden Center, 880 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, (617) 354-4145;
http://www.mahoneysgarden.com/.

o Mount Auburn Cemetery, 580 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge, (617) 547-7105;
http://www.mountauburn.org/.

- Nina MacLaughlin



The rose gardeners only came out at night. A few years back, as Boston
legend
has it, the city needed to cut costs. Lists of expendable expenses were
drawn
up, and the roses - and their maintenance - in the Boston Public Garden were
pruned from the budget. The city decided that roses and the effort to
maintain
them were something Boston could do without. Better than slashing teachers
or
art programs, you might think. Who needs a few flower bushes?

But a gaggle of gardeners felt otherwise. This group of rose-loving Boston
beautifiers banded together and agreed to maintain the roses themselves -
secretly, silently, as volunteers - in order to keep the pride of the Public
Garden
on display. Once a week during the summer, a little after dusk, when most of
the commuters had already passed by and most of the tourists were out to
dinner, the gardeners tended to the roses. Picture men and women in pink and
rose-red camouflage, armed with pruning shears and trowels, ducking and
dashing from
bush to bush. This group of guerrilla gardeners understood, it seems, the
power of plants.

Because when tourists from Japan and Germany visit Boston, when they amble
around with their digital cameras and their guidebooks, they ooh and ahh as
they
walk through the Public Garden. They take pictures. "What a beautiful city,"
they say to their friends at home. And maybe they're not thinking of the
roses
in particular, but the flowers certainly add to the overall effect. More
tourists come. They go out to dinner and stay in hotels and go to museums
and on
Duck Tours, and Boston wins.

Closer to home, when we walk through the gardens with frazzled post-work
brains or on hazy summer afternoons, and we see the care and color, it makes
us
feel better, too. We take pride in Boston, and we want to keep it blooming.
The
volunteer rose brigade knew this, and their stealth tending is testament to
the power and pleasure flowers can bring to a city.

Urban gardening - planting, growing, and harvesting something in a limited
space in the city - is an art form, but you don't have to be a rogue rose
warrior to have access to a plot. Across Boston, there are more than 250
community
gardens, areas open to the public for individuals to claim a plot of land to
grow beets or begonias, peonies, pansies, or potatoes. And whether you live
in
Brighton or Beacon Hill, Allston or Roxbury, chances are there's a community
garden nearby where you can start growing.

The positive results from these gardens range from the personal to the
public. "I could go on and on about the benefits of these community
programs," says
Betsy Johnson, treasurer of the American Community Gardening Association and
executive director of Chefs Collaborative, a national network of people in
the
food community who promote sustainable cuisine and responsible food-industry
practices. "You can put gardening in the mental-health category," she says.
"It's a way to enjoy nature, have a place that's yours, a reason to get out
and
be away from things." Not to mention the way it beautifies a neighborhood,
she
adds.

For a list of community gardens, look to the Boston Natural Areas Network
(BNAN) Web site, http://www.bostonnatural.org/, which breaks them down by
neighborhood. "Each community garden is managed on an individual basis, and
each
garden has a main contact," Johnson explains. BNAN maintains a list of
contacts
for each garden. To obtain a plot, call BNAN, get the information for the
contact person at the garden you want to be a part of, and get in touch with
that
person. He or she will tell you whether there's a waiting list or not, and
whether the garden can provide a plot.

Each garden has its own set of rules and regulations. In cities like Chicago
and Seattle, community gardens are run by a single state agency. Not here.
The
way the gardens are run "reflects the unique history of each community
garden," says Jo Ann Whitehead, a garden educator at BNAN. "Every one has
its own
story. That there's no one way of doing things reflects that." Here,
management
depends on volunteer gardeners. They collect dues, maintain waiting lists,
run
spring and fall meetings. Price per plot depends on water. "Each garden has
to figure out how much it needs to charge in order to pay for the water,"
says
Johnson. Renting a plot for the summer costs anywhere from about $10 to $50.

Like the rules of the gardens, what grows in each varies from neighborhood
to
neighborhood. "There's a large preponderance of vegetable-growing," says
Johnson, but some community gardens, like the Fenway Victory Gardens - one
of the
most visible and well-known - have more flowers than vegetables, due to
vandalism and a large rat population. The garden at the Boston Nature
Center, on the
other hand, one of the biggest in the city with about 300 plots, has nothing
but vegetables. "They just evolve this way," says Johnson.

"It's not like gardening in your own back yard," says Whitehead. "Some
people
think in terms of 'it's my plot now,' but it really is a public space, and
it
won't survive without the community." And it's precisely that idea that
makes
community gardens so special, says Johnson. "That's part of the beauty of
community gardens. Everyone's right there."

But plenty of people prefer the privacy of their own back deck, front porch,
or fire escape, and it's possible to do a lot of planting in a little space.
"Gardening is more of a challenge for a person in the city," says Mark
Cutler,
an operations manager at Mahoney's Garden Center, in Cambridge, who moved
from
a Maine home with apple trees in his yard to a North End apartment with a
tiny fire escape. But Cutler made his space work by cultivating some dwarfed
evergreens and "beautiful, albeit small" pots. "Not to overuse the phrase,"
he
says, "but it's Zen-like. It's one of the most calming things to go out
there at
the end of the day and have a drink and enjoy the sunset."

To create your own city garden, there are a few basic factors to consider,
says Cutler. "Know your light conditions," because light determines what
kinds
of plants will thrive. "Is there direct sun or is the space in the shade?"
Then
you have to decide if you want your mini-garden to be a one-season affair,
or
if you want something that's year-round. "If you just want some summer
color," Cutler says, you have a wide variety of flower and container
options: "You
can use a boot as long as it holds soil," he says.

For the amateur gardener, someone who might not have 20 minutes every
evening
to trim and tend and weed and water, Cutler suggests some nearly fail-proof
plants. "It's New England, and let's face it, you can't go wrong with
geraniums." And, surprisingly, roses aren't something you need to fuss over:
"There are
varieties that will take care of themselves." When it comes to vegetables,
almost all of which need bright light, tomatoes and basil are the most
popular
options. Mahoney's carries more than 80 varieties of tomatoes alone. "You
can
get a compact 'patio' tomato" that's meant to be small, Cutler says. Veggies
to
watch out for if you're dealing with cramped conditions are zucchini and
squash, which tend to run.

Ornamental grasses, which can grow up to eight feet, prove a popular choice.
More exotic and unusual options include Bismark palms, "with big, dramatic,
silver-blue, hand-shaped" leaves, or jasmine, which flowers all summer.
Cutler
recommends hibiscus, morning glories, and mandevilla vines. What you choose
also depends on whether you're into instant gratification ("Start with a
six-foot
tree") or willing to test your patience ("Start real small").

And now's the time to start planning for the summer. Cutler recommends
coming
into the Garden Center or other nursery not only with an idea of what your
light conditions are, but also with thoughts about how you want to fill the
space you have. Like any other trend, flowers go in and out of style. "What
was
hot a few years ago, people don't want to look at now," Cutler says. Look
around. See what you like. And read through gardening books. "Now, when
everything's
put to bed, is the time to be the imaginative gardener," says Cutler.

If your thumb needs some help getting green, the Cambridge Center for Adult
Education offers several gardening classes. "Container Gardening for the
Horticulturally Challenged," for example, takes place on May 16 and costs
$63.

On the other hand, if you've got no interest in growing your own anything,
Boston's got acres of gardens to explore, like the Arnold Arboretum, the
Mount
Auburn Cemetery - America's first garden cemetery - and, of course, the
Boston
Public Garden, roses and all.

Nina MacLaughlin can be reached at nmaclaughlin@phx.com .


--part1_65.25dcc6a8.2d9db1fc_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><HTML><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT
BA=
CK=3D"#ffffff" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 PTSIZE=3D10
FAMI=
LY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>
Thursday, April 01, 2004&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>
COMING UP ROSES<BR>
Tips and tricks for urban gardening<BR>
BY NINA MACLAUGHLIN<BR>
Boston Phoenix <BR>
<BR>
 <BR>
The rose gardeners only came out at night. A few years back, as Boston
legen=
d has it, the city needed to cut costs. Lists of expendable expenses were
dr=
awn up, and the roses - and their maintenance - in the Boston Public
Garden=20=
were pruned from the budget. The city decided that roses and the effort to
m=
aintain them were something Boston could do without. Better than slashing
te=
achers or art programs, you might think. Who needs a few flower bushes?<BR>
<BR>
But a gaggle of gardeners felt otherwise. This group of rose-loving Boston
b=
eautifiers banded together and agreed to maintain the roses themselves -
sec=
retly, silently, as volunteers - in order to keep the pride of the Public
Ga=
rden on display. Once a week during the summer, a little after dusk, when
mo=
st of the commuters had already passed by and most of the tourists were
out=20=
to dinner, the gardeners tended to the roses. Picture men and women in
pink=20=
and rose-red camouflage, armed with pruning shears and trowels, ducking
and=20=
dashing from bush to bush. This group of guerrilla gardeners understood,
it=20=
seems, the power of plants.<BR>
<BR>
Because when tourists from Japan and Germany visit Boston, when they amble
a=
round with their digital cameras and their guidebooks, they ooh and ahh as
t=
hey walk through the Public Garden. They take pictures. "What a beautiful
ci=
ty," they say to their friends at home. And maybe they're not thinking of
th=
e roses in particular, but the flowers certainly add to the overall
effect.=20=
More tourists come. They go out to dinner and stay in hotels and go to
museu=
ms and on Duck Tours, and Boston wins.<BR>
<BR>
Closer to home, when we walk through the gardens with frazzled post-work
bra=
ins or on hazy summer afternoons, and we see the care and color, it makes
us=
 feel better, too. We take pride in Boston, and we want to keep it
blooming.=
 The volunteer rose brigade knew this, and their stealth tending is
testamen=
t to the power and pleasure flowers can bring to a city.<BR>
<BR>
Urban gardening - planting, growing, and harvesting something in a limited
s=
pace in the city - is an art form, but you don't have to be a rogue rose
war=
rior to have access to a plot. Across Boston, there are more than 250
commun=
ity gardens, areas open to the public for individuals to claim a plot of
lan=
d to grow beets or begonias, peonies, pansies, or potatoes. And whether
you=20=
live in Brighton or Beacon Hill, Allston or Roxbury, chances are there's a
c=
ommunity garden nearby where you can start growing.<BR>
<BR>
The positive results from these gardens range from the personal to the
publi=
c. "I could go on and on about the benefits of these community programs,"
sa=
ys Betsy Johnson, treasurer of the American Community Gardening
Association=20=
and executive director of Chefs Collaborative, a national network of
people=20=
in the food community who promote sustainable cuisine and responsible
food-i=
ndustry practices. "You can put gardening in the mental-health category,"
sh=
e says. "It's a way to enjoy nature, have a place that's yours, a reason
to=20=
get out and be away from things." Not to mention the way it beautifies a
nei=
ghborhood, she adds.<BR>
<BR>
For a list of community gardens, look to the Boston Natural Areas Network
(B=
NAN) Web site, <A
HREF=3D"http://www.bostonnatural.org/";>http://www.bostonna=
tural.org/</A>, which breaks them down by neighborhood. "Each community
gard=
en is managed on an individual basis, and each garden has a main contact,"
J=
ohnson explains. BNAN maintains a list of contacts for each garden. To
obtai=
n a plot, call BNAN, get the information for the contact person at the
garde=
n you want to be a part of, and get in touch with that person. He or she
wil=
l tell you whether there's a waiting list or not, and whether the garden
can=
 provide a plot.<BR>
<BR>
Each garden has its own set of rules and regulations. In cities like
Chicago=
 and Seattle, community gardens are run by a single state agency. Not
here.=20=
The way the gardens are run "reflects the unique history of each community
g=
arden," says Jo Ann Whitehead, a garden educator at BNAN. "Every one has
its=
 own story. That there's no one way of doing things reflects that." Here,
ma=
nagement depends on volunteer gardeners. They collect dues, maintain
waiting=
 lists, run spring and fall meetings. Price per plot depends on water.
"Each=
 garden has to figure out how much it needs to charge in order to pay for
th=
e water," says Johnson. Renting a plot for the summer costs anywhere from
ab=
out $10 to $50.<BR>
<BR>
Like the rules of the gardens, what grows in each varies from neighborhood
t=
o neighborhood. "There's a large preponderance of vegetable-growing," says
J=
ohnson, but some community gardens, like the Fenway Victory Gardens - one
of=
 the most visible and well-known - have more flowers than vegetables, due
to=
 vandalism and a large rat population. The garden at the Boston Nature
Cente=
r, on the other hand, one of the biggest in the city with about 300 plots,
h=
as nothing but vegetables. "They just evolve this way," says Johnson.<BR>
<BR>
"It's not like gardening in your own back yard," says Whitehead. "Some
peopl=
e think in terms of 'it's my plot now,' but it really is a public space,
and=
 it won't survive without the community." And it's precisely that idea
that=20=
makes community gardens so special, says Johnson. "That's part of the
beauty=
 of community gardens. Everyone's right there."<BR>
<BR>
But plenty of people prefer the privacy of their own back deck, front
porch,=
 or fire escape, and it's possible to do a lot of planting in a little
space=
. "Gardening is more of a challenge for a person in the city," says Mark
Cut=
ler, an operations manager at Mahoney's Garden Center, in Cambridge, who
mov=
ed from a Maine home with apple trees in his yard to a North End apartment
w=
ith a tiny fire escape. But Cutler made his space work by cultivating some
d=
warfed evergreens and "beautiful, albeit small" pots. "Not to overuse the
ph=
rase," he says, "but it's Zen-like. It's one of the most calming things to
g=
o out there at the end of the day and have a drink and enjoy the
sunset."<BR=
>
<BR>
To create your own city garden, there are a few basic factors to consider,
s=
ays Cutler. "Know your light conditions," because light determines what
kind=
s of plants will thrive. "Is there direct sun or is the space in the
shade?"=
 Then you have to decide if you want your mini-garden to be a one-season
aff=
air, or if you want something that's year-round. "If you just want some
summ=
er color," Cutler says, you have a wide variety of flower and container
opti=
ons: "You can use a boot as long as it holds soil," he says.<BR>
<BR>
For the amateur gardener, someone who might not have 20 minutes every
evenin=
g to trim and tend and weed and water, Cutler suggests some nearly
fail-proo=
f plants. "It's New England, and let's face it, you can't go wrong with
gera=
niums." And, surprisingly, roses aren't something you need to fuss over:
"Th=
ere are varieties that will take care of themselves." When it comes to
veget=
ables, almost all of which need bright light, tomatoes and basil are the
mos=
t popular options. Mahoney's carries more than 80 varieties of tomatoes
alon=
e. "You can get a compact 'patio' tomato" that's meant to be small, Cutler
s=
ays. Veggies to watch out for if you're dealing with cramped conditions
are=20=
zucchini and squash, which tend to run.<BR>
<BR>
Ornamental grasses, which can grow up to eight feet, prove a popular
choice.=
 More exotic and unusual options include Bismark palms, "with big,
dramatic,=
 silver-blue, hand-shaped" leaves, or jasmine, which flowers all summer.
Cut=
ler recommends hibiscus, morning glories, and mandevilla vines. What you
cho=
ose also depends on whether you're into instant gratification ("Start with
a=
 six-foot tree") or willing to test your patience ("Start real small").<BR>
<BR>
And now's the time to start planning for the summer. Cutler recommends
comin=
g into the Garden Center or other nursery not only with an idea of what
your=
 light conditions are, but also with thoughts about how you want to fill
the=
 space you have. Like any other trend, flowers go in and out of style.
"What=
 was hot a few years ago, people don't want to look at now," Cutler says.
Lo=
ok around. See what you like. And read through gardening books. "Now, when
e=
verything's put to bed, is the time to be the imaginative gardener," says
Cu=
tler.<BR>
<BR>
If your thumb needs some help getting green, the Cambridge Center for
Adult=20=
Education offers several gardening classes. "Container Gardening for the
Hor=
ticulturally Challenged," for example, takes place on May 16 and costs
$63.<=
BR>
<BR>
On the other hand, if you've got no interest in growing your own anything,
B=
oston's got acres of gardens to explore, like the Arnold Arboretum, the
Moun=
t Auburn Cemetery - America's first garden cemetery - and, of course, the
Bo=
ston Public Garden, roses and all.<BR>
<BR>
Nina MacLaughlin can be reached at nmaclaughlin@phx.com .<BR>
 <BR>
 <BR>
 <BR>
 <BR>
<BR>
 <BR>
&nbsp; <BR>
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&nbsp; Thursday, April 01, 2004&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>
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&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; E-Mail This Article to a Friend <BR>
<BR>
Coming up roses<BR>
Tips and tricks for urban gardening<BR>
BY NINA MACLAUGHLIN <BR>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
=
----<BR>
 <BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
=
----<BR>
<BR>
Where to go for the green <BR>
<BR>
o Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, (617) 524-1718;
http://www.=
arboretum.harvard.edu/.<BR>
<BR>
o Boston Natural Areas Network, http://www.bostonnatural.org/.<BR>
<BR>
o Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan, (617) 983-8500;
http=
://www.massaudubon.org/Nature_Connection/Sanctuaries/Boston/index.php.<BR>
<BR>
o Boston Public Garden, Charles Street, Boston, (617) 635-7383.<BR>
<BR>
o Cambridge Center for Adult Education, 56 Brattle Street, Cambridge,
(617)=20=
547-6789; http://www.ccae.org./<BR>
<BR>
o Fenway Victory Gardens, the Fens, Boston;
http://www.fenwayvictorygardens.=
com/.<BR>
<BR>
o Mahoney's Garden Center, 880 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, (617) 354-4145;
ht=
tp://www.mahoneysgarden.com/.<BR>
<BR>
o Mount Auburn Cemetery, 580 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge, (617)
547-7105;=
 http://www.mountauburn.org/.<BR>
<BR>
- Nina MacLaughlin<BR>
 <BR>
 <BR>
<BR>
The rose gardeners only came out at night. A few years back, as Boston
legen=
d has it, the city needed to cut costs. Lists of expendable expenses were
dr=
awn up, and the roses - and their maintenance - in the Boston Public
Garden=20=
were pruned from the budget. The city decided that roses and the effort to
m=
aintain them were something Boston could do without. Better than slashing
te=
achers or art programs, you might think. Who needs a few flower bushes?<BR>
<BR>
But a gaggle of gardeners felt otherwise. This group of rose-loving Boston
b=
eautifiers banded together and agreed to maintain the roses themselves -
sec=
retly, silently, as volunteers - in order to keep the pride of the Public
Ga=
rden on display. Once a week during the summer, a little after dusk, when
mo=
st of the commuters had already passed by and most of the tourists were
out=20=
to dinner, the gardeners tended to the roses. Picture men and women in
pink=20=
and rose-red camouflage, armed with pruning shears and trowels, ducking
and=20=
dashing from bush to bush. This group of guerrilla gardeners understood,
it=20=
seems, the power of plants.<BR>
<BR>
Because when tourists from Japan and Germany visit Boston, when they amble
a=
round with their digital cameras and their guidebooks, they ooh and ahh as
t=
hey walk through the Public Garden. They take pictures. "What a beautiful
ci=
ty," they say to their friends at home. And maybe they're not thinking of
th=
e roses in particular, but the flowers certainly add to the overall
effect.=20=
More tourists come. They go out to dinner and stay in hotels and go to
museu=
ms and on Duck Tours, and Boston wins.<BR>
<BR>
Closer to home, when we walk through the gardens with frazzled post-work
bra=
ins or on hazy summer afternoons, and we see the care and color, it makes
us=
 feel better, too. We take pride in Boston, and we want to keep it
blooming.=
 The volunteer rose brigade knew this, and their stealth tending is
testamen=
t to the power and pleasure flowers can bring to a city.<BR>
<BR>
Urban gardening - planting, growing, and harvesting something in a limited
s=
pace in the city - is an art form, but you don't have to be a rogue rose
war=
rior to have access to a plot. Across Boston, there are more than 250
commun=
ity gardens, areas open to the public for individuals to claim a plot of
lan=
d to grow beets or begonias, peonies, pansies, or potatoes. And whether
you=20=
live in Brighton or Beacon Hill, Allston or Roxbury, chances are there's a
c=
ommunity garden nearby where you can start growing.<BR>
<BR>
The positive results from these gardens range from the personal to the
publi=
c. "I could go on and on about the benefits of these community programs,"
sa=
ys Betsy Johnson, treasurer of the American Community Gardening
Association=20=
and executive director of Chefs Collaborative, a national network of
people=20=
in the food community who promote sustainable cuisine and responsible
food-i=
ndustry practices. "You can put gardening in the mental-health category,"
sh=
e says. "It's a way to enjoy nature, have a place that's yours, a reason
to=20=
get out and be away from things." Not to mention the way it beautifies a
nei=
ghborhood, she adds.<BR>
<BR>
For a list of community gardens, look to the Boston Natural Areas Network
(B=
NAN) Web site, http://www.bostonnatural.org/, which breaks them down by
neig=
hborhood. "Each community garden is managed on an individual basis, and
each=
 garden has a main contact," Johnson explains. BNAN maintains a list of
cont=
acts for each garden. To obtain a plot, call BNAN, get the information for
t=
he contact person at the garden you want to be a part of, and get in touch
w=
ith that person. He or she will tell you whether there's a waiting list or
n=
ot, and whether the garden can provide a plot.<BR>
<BR>
Each garden has its own set of rules and regulations. In cities like
Chicago=
 and Seattle, community gardens are run by a single state agency. Not
here.=20=
The way the gardens are run "reflects the unique history of each community
g=
arden," says Jo Ann Whitehead, a garden educator at BNAN. "Every one has
its=
 own story. That there's no one way of doing things reflects that." Here,
ma=
nagement depends on volunteer gardeners. They collect dues, maintain
waiting=
 lists, run spring and fall meetings. Price per plot depends on water.
"Each=
 garden has to figure out how much it needs to charge in order to pay for
th=
e water," says Johnson. Renting a plot for the summer costs anywhere from
ab=
out $10 to $50.<BR>
<BR>
Like the rules of the gardens, what grows in each varies from neighborhood
t=
o neighborhood. "There's a large preponderance of vegetable-growing," says
J=
ohnson, but some community gardens, like the Fenway Victory Gardens - one
of=
 the most visible and well-known - have more flowers than vegetables, due
to=
 vandalism and a large rat population. The garden at the Boston Nature
Cente=
r, on the other hand, one of the biggest in the city with about 300 plots,
h=
as nothing but vegetables. "They just evolve this way," says Johnson.<BR>
<BR>
"It's not like gardening in your own back yard," says Whitehead. "Some
peopl=
e think in terms of 'it's my plot now,' but it really is a public space,
and=
 it won't survive without the community." And it's precisely that idea
that=20=
makes community gardens so special, says Johnson. "That's part of the
beauty=
 of community gardens. Everyone's right there."<BR>
<BR>
But plenty of people prefer the privacy of their own back deck, front
porch,=
 or fire escape, and it's possible to do a lot of planting in a little
space=
. "Gardening is more of a challenge for a person in the city," says Mark
Cut=
ler, an operations manager at Mahoney's Garden Center, in Cambridge, who
mov=
ed from a Maine home with apple trees in his yard to a North End apartment
w=
ith a tiny fire escape. But Cutler made his space work by cultivating some
d=
warfed evergreens and "beautiful, albeit small" pots. "Not to overuse the
ph=
rase," he says, "but it's Zen-like. It's one of the most calming things to
g=
o out there at the end of the day and have a drink and enjoy the
sunset."<BR=
>
<BR>
To create your own city garden, there are a few basic factors to consider,
s=
ays Cutler. "Know your light conditions," because light determines what
kind=
s of plants will thrive. "Is there direct sun or is the space in the
shade?"=
 Then you have to decide if you want your mini-garden to be a one-season
aff=
air, or if you want something that's year-round. "If you just want some
summ=
er color," Cutler says, you have a wide variety of flower and container
opti=
ons: "You can use a boot as long as it holds soil," he says.<BR>
<BR>
For the amateur gardener, someone who might not have 20 minutes every
evenin=
g to trim and tend and weed and water, Cutler suggests some nearly
fail-proo=
f plants. "It's New England, and let's face it, you can't go wrong with
gera=
niums." And, surprisingly, roses aren't something you need to fuss over:
"Th=
ere are varieties that will take care of themselves." When it comes to
veget=
ables, almost all of which need bright light, tomatoes and basil are the
mos=
t popular options. Mahoney's carries more than 80 varieties of tomatoes
alon=
e. "You can get a compact 'patio' tomato" that's meant to be small, Cutler
s=
ays. Veggies to watch out for if you're dealing with cramped conditions
are=20=
zucchini and squash, which tend to run.<BR>
<BR>
Ornamental grasses, which can grow up to eight feet, prove a popular
choice.=
 More exotic and unusual options include Bismark palms, "with big,
dramatic,=
 silver-blue, hand-shaped" leaves, or jasmine, which flowers all summer.
Cut=
ler recommends hibiscus, morning glories, and mandevilla vines. What you
cho=
ose also depends on whether you're into instant gratification ("Start with
a=
 six-foot tree") or willing to test your patience ("Start real small").<BR>
<BR>
And now's the time to start planning for the summer. Cutler recommends
comin=
g into the Garden Center or other nursery not only with an idea of what
your=
 light conditions are, but also with thoughts about how you want to fill
the=
 space you have. Like any other trend, flowers go in and out of style.
"What=
 was hot a few years ago, people don't want to look at now," Cutler says.
Lo=
ok around. See what you like. And read through gardening books. "Now, when
e=
verything's put to bed, is the time to be the imaginative gardener," says
Cu=
tler.<BR>
<BR>
If your thumb needs some help getting green, the Cambridge Center for
Adult=20=
Education offers several gardening classes. "Container Gardening for the
Hor=
ticulturally Challenged," for example, takes place on May 16 and costs
$63.<=
BR>
<BR>
On the other hand, if you've got no interest in growing your own anything,
B=
oston's got acres of gardens to explore, like the Arnold Arboretum, the
Moun=
t Auburn Cemetery - America's first garden cemetery - and, of course, the
Bo=
ston Public Garden, roses and all.<BR>
<BR>
Nina MacLaughlin can be reached at nmaclaughlin@phx.com .<BR>
 <BR>
</FONT></HTML>
--part1_65.25dcc6a8.2d9db1fc_boundary--




--__--__--

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's
services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find
out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org

To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


End of community_garden Digest


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





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