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RE: [COMFOOD:] listserves are history?

  • Subject: [cg] RE: [COMFOOD:] listserves are history?
  • From: "Chef Kurt Michael Friese" k.friese@mchsi.com
  • Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2006 18:47:29 -0500
  • Thread-index: AcZrHI52Y1+egxeXRBeJ5Q/DqnetIAAAFuaA

I may be naive (probably so), but if they pass this, and companies move to
restrict access to, say, a union that is organizing against Microsoft,
wouldn't there be a flood of internet users over to ISPs that offer
unrestricted access?  And a flood of ISPs moving to offer that access due to
high demand?
The internet was built originally as a DoD tool to make it possible for
communications to continue even if one place or another was knocked off the
grid, routing communications through any of a million other junction points.
How would this legislation, pointless & unfair though it may be, make it so
that I could not access COMFOOD's website (or any other), presuming my ISP
offers such unrestricted access?


From: Sympa user [mailto:sympa@elist.tufts.edu] On Behalf Of Ken
Sent: Friday, April 28, 2006 6:36 PM
To: comfood@elist.tufts.edu; community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: [COMFOOD:] listserves are history?

A nationwide network of nonprofit organizations, including the Organic
Consumers Association, are mobilizing to stop Congress from passing a law
that would enable telecommunications giants to control the flow of traffic
on the internet. Companies like AT&T, Verizon and Comcast are pressuring
Congress to pass the "Telecom Reform Bill" that would allow them to restrict
or slow down your access to certain websites on the internet. As an example,
last year, Canada's version of AT&T -- Telus -- blocked their internet
customers from visiting a web site sympathetic to workers with whom Telus
was negotiating. This controversial bill would create a similar situation in
the U.S. whereby telephone and cable companies would have increased power to
control how well (or poorly) specific websites, including those operated by
nonprofit organizations, would function on your computer. The current
construction of the internet allows everyone to compete on a level playing
field. This is the reason that the internet is a force for economic
innovation, civic participation and free speech. If the public doesn't speak
up now, Congress will hand over control of the internet to these
telecommunications monopolies.
Please take action: http://www.organicconsumers.org/rd/telecom.cfm


Ken Hargesheimer

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