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Re: Piped in Water, Anyone?

  • Subject: Re: [cg] Piped in Water, Anyone?
  • From: "Sandy Pernitz" Sandy.Pernitz@Seattle.Gov
  • Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2006 12:12:32 -0800

Ok now I have to chime in...all our gardens have municipal water sources
but collecting water has benefits you can't get from a municipal water
source.  One of the big ones no chlorine and a warmer temperature which
the plants love.  Lets think about our water like we think about our
soil...we love our soil and feed it, collected rainwater helps feed the
soil.  Now I know we don't find diapers on our roofs and don't have as
much industry so testing in a major city like New York would be good
too.  

The follow is something written for a series of rainbarrels in one of
our gardens.

We have been doing some testing of collected water in plastic barrels
and metal cisterns and have found all water safe for plants.  From what
I have been able to find out, it is new plastic barrels that pose the
most leaching but that changes over time.  It sounds to me like most of
you are using food grade barrels that are poly based.  I would be more
concerned with using the PVC parts which is shown to have serious
leaching possibilities and is extremely bad for the environment and
those producing it in production.

So collect away!!!! I would still LOVE to see those water towers on
your roofs in NYC with big funnels to collect water and pipe down to
gardens and for flushing toilets to name a few uses!

Education:
WHAT IS YOUR ECOLOGICAL ADDRESS?
GET TO KNOW THE WATERSHED YOU LIVE, WORK AND GARDEN IN

Water Conservation
Conservation is the most cost-effective source of water supply for our
region.  And even with new sources being added in the future, we still
need to use water efficiently to ensure a sustainable supply.  Every
drop counts.

Water Quality
(Another great thing to mention that I did not is that organic
gardening has a direct impact on "water quality" issues!)
The paving trend of our urban neighborhoods has been going on for
decades.  It is time for all of us to contribute in anyway we can to
cleanup and conserve our limited water supply.  Storm water goes
directly through the storm drains or over land untreated into Lake
Union.  Street runoff in our concrete urban environment pickup all kinds
of toxic substances on its way to the Lake (litter, oil, gas,
antifreeze, etc.).  Street runoff accounts for significant and
preventable sources of non-point source pollution. We as individuals and
communities can rethink the ways we design and use water.  Systems
collecting and redirecting rainwater can reduce the amount of water
overtaxing our sewer systems and filter water normally wasted on
impervious surfaces naturally back to the water table.  Water collection
systems are one easy, inexpensive way we can all positively effect our
water!



Thanks for your time,
Sandy Pernitz
Community Garden Coordinator
P-Patch Program/Dept. of Neighborhoods
An ancient Chinese philosopher once fell asleep and dreamed he was a
butterfly.  When he awoke, he was no longer certain that's what had
happened.  Perhaps he was just a butterfly dreaming he was a Chinese
philosopher... Chinese parable
We have moved! NEW ADDDRESS
Department of Neighborhoods
700 5th Avenue Suite 1700
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649
sandy.pernitz@seattle.gov 
206-684-0284


>>> <adam36055@aol.com> 02/15 6:19 AM >>>
One expensive, though doable solution to the muss and fuss of storage
barrels ( mosquitoes, etc) is getting water piped in from your
municipality. 
 
Yes, getting the plumbing done, a water vault installed, a meter -
working out a deal by which the city picks up the water cost ( usually
with the Parks Dept) and laying out piping throughout your garden is
alot of work and mess, but the rewards are being able to turn on a
spigot and get water for your hose. 
 
Writing grants and internal fundraising is how groups that I've worked
with have done this. Like anything else of this sort, it's usually a
long, protracted process, unless you find the right foundation and
donors pretty quickly. 
 
And you also have to remember to shut the water down when the freeze is
going to hit, so the pipes don't burst. 
 
Regards, 
 
Adam Honigman  
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Fred Conrad <fred.conrad@acfb.org>
To: gtaylor@mcic.org; community_garden@mallorn.com 
Sent: Wed, 15 Feb 2006 08:35:29 -0500
Subject: RE: [cg] Barrels to store rainwater for greenhouse gardening


like Judy said, i'm thinking that the "leakage" is carcinogenic
chemicals into 
the water.  softer plastics leak more and faster and at all
temperatures.  most 
cancer survivors that have done any research about environmental
exposure know 
that nobody ever should ever use a microwave oven to heat food that is
in or 
covered by plastic - especially not to cover the food with that
stretchy soft 
plastic wrap to keep it from splattering.  at high temps there is
measurable 
transference into the food.  these are serious health issues.

on the question of uptake of these chemicals by vegetables via water...
who 
knows?  rain barrels probably don't get hot enough to change the
emission rate, 
but even at room temperature they might be leaking something. 
multiplied by how 
long the water stays in the barrels?

i use plastic rainbarrels, by the way!
fgc


-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com 
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of Garth Taylor
Sent: Tuesday, February 14, 2006 10:56 AM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com 
Subject: [cg] Barrels to store rainwater for greenhouse gardening


Does anyone have advice on the best type of barrel to use to capture
rainwater from the roof, bring it inside a greenhouse, and use it to
water
fruits and vegetables. I have been using 55-gallon blue plastic barrels
that
were once used for some kind of food transport.

 

I like the barrels because they are easy to work with - I can use PVC
materials to install spigots and overflow drains; and because they are
low
cost.

 

But someone told me there is a risk of leakage from the plastic into
the
water where there is a high temperature. Has anyone heard about this
problem? How high does the temperature have to be? Are we talking about
the
temperature of the water in the barrel (which is always pretty low
because
it is a heat/cold sink), or the temperature of the air?

 

What would be a better system?

 

Also, where can I get more of these blue barrels?

 

 

Thanks,

 

=Garth Taylor

Chicago / Southwest Michigan


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______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's 
services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to
find out 
how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org 


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com 

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription: 
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden 


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and
to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org 


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com 

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription: 
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





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