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Neighborhood Open Space Coalition Newsletter


The Neighbohood Open Space Coalition is a NYC good government, public
greening, community garden advocate organization. We love these guys.

FYI
 

-----Original Message-----
From:	dave.lutz@treebranch.com [SMTP:dave.lutz@treebranch.com]
Sent:	Thursday, January 04, 2001 1:37 PM
To:	urbanoutdoors@treebranch.com
Subject:	urbanoutdoors: Urban Outdoors #65


U r b a n   O u t d o o r s         
No. 65 - January 3, 2000 
1999 Winner, NYC American Planning Assoc. Award for Journalism

EDITORS NOTE:
We had hoped to start the New Year with an upbeat edition about the 
past year's progress at NOSC, but a flood of additional news about 
the sale and pending destruction of public open space arrived at our 
offices. 

Public open space is the infrastructure for both healthful physical 
activity and contemplative relaxation. Provision of public space does 
not cost, it saves money by cutting health costs and infrastructure 
expenses.  These are good times for NYC. Even in winter, our streets 
are again alive with the sound of children playing. Most of us feel 
safer and more confident about the future of our city, but quality of 
life demands that government provide for the care and provision of 
adequate park facilities for our people. Open space is a basic human 
need, and it is not here for one generation to sell and the next to 
do without.

NOSC/ FoG needs your help in order to continue its work and to keep 
you informed about our urban environment. Please print the coupon at 
the bottom of this newsletter and become a NOSC/ FoG member in 2001. 
Our membership is our greatest strength.		- Dave Lutz

WATER THEME PARK FOR FLUSHING MEADOWS
Meadow Lake and Willow Lake would be combined in order to create a 
regatta course massive enough to handle the Olympic games. Because 
Jewel Avenue would be in the way of the One-big-lake, it would be 
elevated, adding another strap to the circle of highways that girdle 
and dissect the park. A massive high-powered water roller coaster 
would be built elsewhere in Flushing Meadows to accommodate white 
water kayaking and canoe events. It would be made permanent after the 
Olympics "to benefit the public", presumably for a hefty fee. A 
careful read of www.nyc2012.com, reveals that these changes in 
Flushing Meadows Park would be among the legacies of having the games 
in our city. The web site, though a technological marvel, is not 
strong on details.

Neil deMause of the Village Voice, in a recent report, debunks the 
myth that Olympic games make money. "The Atlanta and Sydney Olympic 
committees balanced their books by transferring costs: land, Olympic 
housing, police and fire department overtime, to the public sector. 
The Atlanta games, according to Georgia Tech planning professor Larry 
Keating, cost the public $1 billion in housing and infrastructure, 
while an audit by New South Wales came up with a loss for the Sydney 
games of about.$1.5 billion." The Voice reports that projected 
tourism growth does not pan out.

LUXURY HIGHRISE TO DISPLACE 500 KIDS
A Harlem field of dreams - built by a group that uses baseball to 
reach city kids - is again in danger of being replaced by a 
high-rise. The 3.5-acre park with two baseball diamonds at 100th 
Street and First Avenue was a garbage-strewn lot and hangout for drug 
peddlers until the NY chapter of RBI - Reviving Baseball in Inner 
Cities - took it over in 1991. The Department of Housing Preservation 
and Development (HPD) is reviewing proposals to use half the site for 
market-price apartments. 

"The situation is similar to that of [building on] the community 
gardens except it's two-thirds of a city block and it's used by about 
500 kids," said Rich Berlin, executive director of Harlem RBI. RBI 
offers year-round educational programs, mentoring, college 
preparation and internships - using baseball to connect with local 
youngsters. RBI baseball leagues play at the fields in the spring, 
summer and autumn, and several other nonprofits use them as well, 
helping to reduce crime in the area. Berlin has begun circulating 
petitions, on paper and the Internet (www.harlemrbi.org), urging the 
Mayor to block any development of the ball fields.

FOREST OR STRIP MALL AT FOUR SPARROW MARSH
The Friends of Marine Park (FoMP), at a December meeting, unanimously 
voted to oppose development of a 60-acre parcel of waterside land. 
The property, known as the 4 Sparrow Marsh, is located at the 
intersection of the Belt Parkway and Flatbush Ave in Brooklyn, 
abutting Gateway National Recreation Area. Until about a year ago it 
was believed to be entirely in the hands of the NYC Parks. and FoMP 
spent hundreds of hours of volunteer time clearing debris and 
surveying the site. They envisioned planting a mini forest there that 
would help reduce air pollution.

However, the city Economic Development Corporation still owns the 
upland section of the property and a private developer is 
aggressively pushing to build a strip mall. Local activists are 
wondering what came first, the developer or the sudden revelation 
that the land is not parkland. As in the Meadowlands, Vandalia Dunes, 
and all over the country, automotive shopping sprawl seems to be a 
higher priority of government than waterfront land preservation. 
Check www.treebranch.com calendar in two weeks for notice of 
organizing meeting.

GOD BLESS YE MERRY COUNCILMEN
With kind words about the value of the spaces and the significant 
contributions that the gardeners have made to life in our city, the 
City Council land use committee voted to allow 10 gardens in one 
south Bronx neighborhood to be destroyed. At a Dec 14th meeting in 
City Hall, with Bronx gardeners watching, Council Members promised to 
attempt to find alternate spaces for new gardens, even as they 
processed the application that would hand the gardens over to 
developers. During the hearing, a number of Members hoped-out-loud 
that next year the Council would act on pending legislation that 
would provide a process for determining the future of the small parks.

As the vote was being taken, a detailed report examining development 
in the South Bronx community was being printed. "Achieving Balance" 
prepared by Design Trust for Public Space, Bronx Community Board 3 
and Trust for Public Land notes that the South Bronx is not lacking 
in blighted lots. While the area has recovered from the dark days of 
Presidential photo-ops, there is still a large area of unbuilt land 
that is not being gardened. According to Council Member Adolfo 
Carrion, who with two other committee members voted against 
destruction: "It is past time to challenge HPD to do better than 
package the gardens with other development sites." Perhaps the full 
Council should see this report before their final vote on snuffing 
out the gardens. Meanwhile, the gardeners continue to rely on 
Attorney General Spitzer to support their efforts. Until the present 
judicial hold is lifted, the bulldozers cannot destroy a single green 
oasis. 

IS THE MOMENT LOST ON GOVERNORS ISLAND?
SHALL WE SELL IT TO THE DUTCH?
The NY Times has reported that with changes in Washington, including 
the loss of seniority in the Senate, and a President friendly to the 
idea, the acquisition of Governors Island for Park uses may be lost 
for now. According to the Times "President Clinton first offered to 
transfer the island to the State for $1 in 1995 while he was overhead 
in a helicopter with Senator Moynihan. But the transfer of the 
173-acre island became mired in politics, in Washington and in New 
York." A last minute effort has been launched to have President 
Clinton declare the island a National Monument.

Governors Island still inspires men of vision. The NY Observer 
reports that a Dutch Banker, Joep de Koning, would like to rebuild 
colonial New Amsterdam on the Southern portion of the island, 
displacing the military housing. He is willing to commit $100 million 
towards implementation. He estimates that the project would require 
an additional $300 million.  He envisions the place as a symbol of 
tolerance, noting that NY's diversity was in place from its first 
days.  
 
WHEN TREES BREAK SIDEWALKS, WHO PAYS? 
Property owners in Brooklyn and Queens are pressing for City Council 
legislation, introduced by Council Member James Oddo, transferring 
responsibility for sidewalks broken by tree roots to the City. 
"Presently, sidewalks that abut property have to be maintained by 
owners", notes Joe Bernardo of Trees NY, "and when the roots of 
mature trees lift the walkways the owners must pay for the repair. 
Many homeowners have chosen not to replace trees after being hit with 
an unexpected bill for sidewalk replacement" Thus the legislation 
could have the side effect of encouraging the planting of trees in 
neighborhoods where homeowners are watching their pennies.

WHAT GOOD ARE TREES?
A large street or front yard tree produces the following public 
benefits:
1. Saves $30 in summertime air conditioning by shading the building 
and cooling the air.
2. Absorbs 10 lbs of air pollutants, including 4 lbs of ozone and 3 
lbs of particulates. Uptake of NOx by the tree is equivalent to NOx 
emitted by a typical car driven 3,600 miles.
3. Intercepts 760 gal of rainfall in its crown, reducing runoff of 
polluted storm water. 
4. Cleans 330 lbs of CO2 from the atmosphere through direct 
sequestration in the tree's wood and reduced power plant emissions 
due to cooling The tree reduces the same amount of
atmospheric CO2 as released by a typical car driven 500 miles.
5. Adds about 1% to the sales price of the property, or about $25 
each year when annualized over a 40-year period. This assumes a 
median residential property sales price of $100,000.

The value of all benefits is $111 (Colorado). Typically, a city will 
spend $20-$40 per year to maintain a street tree of this size 
(sometimes located in a front yard easement) and a resident will 
spend about $10 per year maintaining a large yard tree. (From: 
www.coloradotrees.org. Original chemical research from Brooklyn NY. 
Translated into typical Colorado costs.)

DOES PAY FOR PARKS ADD UP TO LESS FREE MUSIC FOR NYC?
NYC Parks tried to extract a $50,000 "donation" from a retailer 
before issuing a permit for a summer concert in City Hall Park, the 
NY Post reported. The Parks Department relented after J&R Music World 
complained that it had never been charged so much in the five years 
it had been providing free concerts. "Henry (Commissioner Stern) 
argued that the park has been renovated and was beautiful and they 
should pay [more]," said one Post source. The three-day Jazzfest, 
featuring Herbie Hancock, came off without a hitch Aug. 24-26. 
Sources said Stern agreed to "grandfather" future Jazzfests, but not 
other events.

RENEWED PORT AND PARK FOR SUNSET PARK
"While the status of the port awaits completion of the findings from 
the Cross Harbor-Rail Tunnel Major Investment Study, the first phase 
of this park must proceed toward development." Releasing a set of 
principles for future development of the South Brooklyn waterfront, 
Borough President Howard Golden called for the immediate development 
of parkland at the site. He also suggested that future plans keep an 
eye toward job intensive uses of the working waterfront. "We will 
seek to prevent any inappropriate interim uses....We are serving notice 
that we do not intend to wait to pursue immediate opportunities for 
job growth and for public access to the shoreline."

A SOLAR SUBWAY?
According to Brooklyn's Currier-Life Publications, solar panels will 
be installed on the new Coney Island terminal of four subway lines. 
The panels will be used to capture and distribute heat within the 
station. The newly designed arched elevated station will replace the 
dingy Stillwell Avenue Terminal that is long overdue for an upgrade. 
Local officials have linked the changes to the arrival of a minor 
league baseball franchise, now dubbed the Brooklyn Cyclones.

WWW.TREEBANCH.COM CLIMBS QUICKLY
A national survey of over 100,000 business and organizational web 
sites puts www.treebranch.com in the top five percent of "linked-to" 
sites. Our computer's counter indicates that we average over 500 hits 
a week. This means that many public interest groups in and out of NYC 
find the information that we present to be of general interest to 
their readers. It also allows us, with our "Hub for the Urban 
Environment" to send seekers to other places to learn how to build a 
softer, greener, more livable city. Our web presence is a recent 
addition to our communications program, and thus we are pleased with 
the quick acknowledgement of its value. We thank those who have 
recognized its relevance. We will continue to build and perfect it 
over the coming years.

URBAN OUTDOORS ADVENTURES
Visit www.treebranch.com for hundreds of great events or more 
information about our Urban Outdoors. Add your event to our calendar.

Saturday, January 6 2001, Land Water and Sky Walk. From Sheepshead 
Bay to Floyd Bennett Field. Highlights include the fishing harbor, 
sand dunes of Plumb beach, wildlife area and pond, and the location 
for restoration of historic aircraft in NYC. Meet 10am at Sheepshead 
Bay Road exit of the Sheepshead Bay station of the "D" train. Free, 
Precipitation or wind chill conditions below 25 degrees at 8 am 
cancels. Take transit-not a circular walk. Info: 212-352-9330.

Saturday, January 13, 2001, Hiking the Cold Winter Sands. The dunes 
of Fort Tilden provide sun-traps and microclimates that are warmer 
than the nearby seashore.. Meet at Gateway National Recreation Area, 
Fort Tilden ranger station, (#35 Green Bus Lines from Flatbush Ave 
(Brooklyn College Station) #2 or 5 train) Free, John Gallagher Leads, 
Info: 718-499-9779.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------
Your $35 check to Neighborhood Open Space Coalition helps protect 
NYC's quality of life and keeps Urban Outdoors coming.

Become a year 2001 Member Now!

[   ] I'd like to be a member of Neighborhood Open Space Coalition  
($35)
[   ] I'd like to join Friends of Gateway ($35)
[   ] I'd like to be a member of both NOSC and FoG (Joint Membership 
$50)
[   ] I'd like to make a contribution.  $...................

Name..................................................................
.....

Address...............................................................
......

City..................................State.............Zip...........
......

e-mail....................................................

Phone (..........)..................           
Fax(..........).....................

Organization....................................................... 
Neighborhood Open Space Coalition / Friends of Gateway
356 Seventh Avenue  New York NY 10001  212.352.9330
Fax: 212-352-9338	e-mail: dave.lutz@treebranch.com

URBAN OUTDOORS is the monthly newsletter of Neighborhood Open Space 
Coalition and Friends of Gateway. It reports on citywide public space 
issues and the work of hundreds of local civic groups that take an 
interest in the spaces. To add someone to URBAN OUTDOORS subscriber 
list: Send their name and e-mail address to nosc@treebranch.com. To 
be removed from the list write: "unsubscribe urban outdoors" to the 
same address. If you receive this newsletter by fax: write 
"unsubscribe" on the COVER sheet and fax it back to 212-352-9338.  


> -----Original Message-----
> From:	dave.lutz@treebranch.com [SMTP:dave.lutz@treebranch.com]
> Sent:	Thursday, January 04, 2001 1:37 PM
> To:	urbanoutdoors@treebranch.com
> Subject:	urbanoutdoors: Urban Outdoors #65
> 
> 
> U r b a n   O u t d o o r s         
> No. 65 - January 3, 2000 
> 1999 Winner, NYC American Planning Assoc. Award for Journalism
> 
> EDITORS NOTE:
> We had hoped to start the New Year with an upbeat edition about the 
> past year's progress at NOSC, but a flood of additional news about 
> the sale and pending destruction of public open space arrived at our 
> offices. 
> 
> Public open space is the infrastructure for both healthful physical 
> activity and contemplative relaxation. Provision of public space does 
> not cost, it saves money by cutting health costs and infrastructure 
> expenses.  These are good times for NYC. Even in winter, our streets 
> are again alive with the sound of children playing. Most of us feel 
> safer and more confident about the future of our city, but quality of 
> life demands that government provide for the care and provision of 
> adequate park facilities for our people. Open space is a basic human 
> need, and it is not here for one generation to sell and the next to 
> do without.
> 
> NOSC/ FoG needs your help in order to continue its work and to keep 
> you informed about our urban environment. Please print the coupon at 
> the bottom of this newsletter and become a NOSC/ FoG member in 2001. 
> Our membership is our greatest strength.		- Dave Lutz
> 
> WATER THEME PARK FOR FLUSHING MEADOWS
> Meadow Lake and Willow Lake would be combined in order to create a 
> regatta course massive enough to handle the Olympic games. Because 
> Jewel Avenue would be in the way of the One-big-lake, it would be 
> elevated, adding another strap to the circle of highways that girdle 
> and dissect the park. A massive high-powered water roller coaster 
> would be built elsewhere in Flushing Meadows to accommodate white 
> water kayaking and canoe events. It would be made permanent after the 
> Olympics "to benefit the public", presumably for a hefty fee. A 
> careful read of www.nyc2012.com, reveals that these changes in 
> Flushing Meadows Park would be among the legacies of having the games 
> in our city. The web site, though a technological marvel, is not 
> strong on details.
> 
> Neil deMause of the Village Voice, in a recent report, debunks the 
> myth that Olympic games make money. "The Atlanta and Sydney Olympic 
> committees balanced their books by transferring costs: land, Olympic 
> housing, police and fire department overtime, to the public sector. 
> The Atlanta games, according to Georgia Tech planning professor Larry 
> Keating, cost the public $1 billion in housing and infrastructure, 
> while an audit by New South Wales came up with a loss for the Sydney 
> games of about.$1.5 billion." The Voice reports that projected 
> tourism growth does not pan out.
> 
> LUXURY HIGHRISE TO DISPLACE 500 KIDS
> A Harlem field of dreams - built by a group that uses baseball to 
> reach city kids - is again in danger of being replaced by a 
> high-rise. The 3.5-acre park with two baseball diamonds at 100th 
> Street and First Avenue was a garbage-strewn lot and hangout for drug 
> peddlers until the NY chapter of RBI - Reviving Baseball in Inner 
> Cities - took it over in 1991. The Department of Housing Preservation 
> and Development (HPD) is reviewing proposals to use half the site for 
> market-price apartments. 
> 
> "The situation is similar to that of [building on] the community 
> gardens except it's two-thirds of a city block and it's used by about 
> 500 kids," said Rich Berlin, executive director of Harlem RBI. RBI 
> offers year-round educational programs, mentoring, college 
> preparation and internships - using baseball to connect with local 
> youngsters. RBI baseball leagues play at the fields in the spring, 
> summer and autumn, and several other nonprofits use them as well, 
> helping to reduce crime in the area. Berlin has begun circulating 
> petitions, on paper and the Internet (www.harlemrbi.org), urging the 
> Mayor to block any development of the ball fields.
> 
> FOREST OR STRIP MALL AT FOUR SPARROW MARSH
> The Friends of Marine Park (FoMP), at a December meeting, unanimously 
> voted to oppose development of a 60-acre parcel of waterside land. 
> The property, known as the 4 Sparrow Marsh, is located at the 
> intersection of the Belt Parkway and Flatbush Ave in Brooklyn, 
> abutting Gateway National Recreation Area. Until about a year ago it 
> was believed to be entirely in the hands of the NYC Parks. and FoMP 
> spent hundreds of hours of volunteer time clearing debris and 
> surveying the site. They envisioned planting a mini forest there that 
> would help reduce air pollution.
> 
> However, the city Economic Development Corporation still owns the 
> upland section of the property and a private developer is 
> aggressively pushing to build a strip mall. Local activists are 
> wondering what came first, the developer or the sudden revelation 
> that the land is not parkland. As in the Meadowlands, Vandalia Dunes, 
> and all over the country, automotive shopping sprawl seems to be a 
> higher priority of government than waterfront land preservation. 
> Check www.treebranch.com calendar in two weeks for notice of 
> organizing meeting.
> 
> GOD BLESS YE MERRY COUNCILMEN
> With kind words about the value of the spaces and the significant 
> contributions that the gardeners have made to life in our city, the 
> City Council land use committee voted to allow 10 gardens in one 
> south Bronx neighborhood to be destroyed. At a Dec 14th meeting in 
> City Hall, with Bronx gardeners watching, Council Members promised to 
> attempt to find alternate spaces for new gardens, even as they 
> processed the application that would hand the gardens over to 
> developers. During the hearing, a number of Members hoped-out-loud 
> that next year the Council would act on pending legislation that 
> would provide a process for determining the future of the small parks.
> 
> As the vote was being taken, a detailed report examining development 
> in the South Bronx community was being printed. "Achieving Balance" 
> prepared by Design Trust for Public Space, Bronx Community Board 3 
> and Trust for Public Land notes that the South Bronx is not lacking 
> in blighted lots. While the area has recovered from the dark days of 
> Presidential photo-ops, there is still a large area of unbuilt land 
> that is not being gardened. According to Council Member Adolfo 
> Carrion, who with two other committee members voted against 
> destruction: "It is past time to challenge HPD to do better than 
> package the gardens with other development sites." Perhaps the full 
> Council should see this report before their final vote on snuffing 
> out the gardens. Meanwhile, the gardeners continue to rely on 
> Attorney General Spitzer to support their efforts. Until the present 
> judicial hold is lifted, the bulldozers cannot destroy a single green 
> oasis. 
> 
> IS THE MOMENT LOST ON GOVERNORS ISLAND?
> SHALL WE SELL IT TO THE DUTCH?
> The NY Times has reported that with changes in Washington, including 
> the loss of seniority in the Senate, and a President friendly to the 
> idea, the acquisition of Governors Island for Park uses may be lost 
> for now. According to the Times "President Clinton first offered to 
> transfer the island to the State for $1 in 1995 while he was overhead 
> in a helicopter with Senator Moynihan. But the transfer of the 
> 173-acre island became mired in politics, in Washington and in New 
> York." A last minute effort has been launched to have President 
> Clinton declare the island a National Monument.
> 
> Governors Island still inspires men of vision. The NY Observer 
> reports that a Dutch Banker, Joep de Koning, would like to rebuild 
> colonial New Amsterdam on the Southern portion of the island, 
> displacing the military housing. He is willing to commit $100 million 
> towards implementation. He estimates that the project would require 
> an additional $300 million.  He envisions the place as a symbol of 
> tolerance, noting that NY's diversity was in place from its first 
> days.  
>  
> WHEN TREES BREAK SIDEWALKS, WHO PAYS? 
> Property owners in Brooklyn and Queens are pressing for City Council 
> legislation, introduced by Council Member James Oddo, transferring 
> responsibility for sidewalks broken by tree roots to the City. 
> "Presently, sidewalks that abut property have to be maintained by 
> owners", notes Joe Bernardo of Trees NY, "and when the roots of 
> mature trees lift the walkways the owners must pay for the repair. 
> Many homeowners have chosen not to replace trees after being hit with 
> an unexpected bill for sidewalk replacement" Thus the legislation 
> could have the side effect of encouraging the planting of trees in 
> neighborhoods where homeowners are watching their pennies.
> 
> WHAT GOOD ARE TREES?
> A large street or front yard tree produces the following public 
> benefits:
> 1. Saves $30 in summertime air conditioning by shading the building 
> and cooling the air.
> 2. Absorbs 10 lbs of air pollutants, including 4 lbs of ozone and 3 
> lbs of particulates. Uptake of NOx by the tree is equivalent to NOx 
> emitted by a typical car driven 3,600 miles.
> 3. Intercepts 760 gal of rainfall in its crown, reducing runoff of 
> polluted storm water. 
> 4. Cleans 330 lbs of CO2 from the atmosphere through direct 
> sequestration in the tree's wood and reduced power plant emissions 
> due to cooling The tree reduces the same amount of
> atmospheric CO2 as released by a typical car driven 500 miles.
> 5. Adds about 1% to the sales price of the property, or about $25 
> each year when annualized over a 40-year period. This assumes a 
> median residential property sales price of $100,000.
> 
> The value of all benefits is $111 (Colorado). Typically, a city will 
> spend $20-$40 per year to maintain a street tree of this size 
> (sometimes located in a front yard easement) and a resident will 
> spend about $10 per year maintaining a large yard tree. (From: 
> www.coloradotrees.org. Original chemical research from Brooklyn NY. 
> Translated into typical Colorado costs.)
> 
> DOES PAY FOR PARKS ADD UP TO LESS FREE MUSIC FOR NYC?
> NYC Parks tried to extract a $50,000 "donation" from a retailer 
> before issuing a permit for a summer concert in City Hall Park, the 
> NY Post reported. The Parks Department relented after J&R Music World 
> complained that it had never been charged so much in the five years 
> it had been providing free concerts. "Henry (Commissioner Stern) 
> argued that the park has been renovated and was beautiful and they 
> should pay [more]," said one Post source. The three-day Jazzfest, 
> featuring Herbie Hancock, came off without a hitch Aug. 24-26. 
> Sources said Stern agreed to "grandfather" future Jazzfests, but not 
> other events.
> 
> RENEWED PORT AND PARK FOR SUNSET PARK
> "While the status of the port awaits completion of the findings from 
> the Cross Harbor-Rail Tunnel Major Investment Study, the first phase 
> of this park must proceed toward development." Releasing a set of 
> principles for future development of the South Brooklyn waterfront, 
> Borough President Howard Golden called for the immediate development 
> of parkland at the site. He also suggested that future plans keep an 
> eye toward job intensive uses of the working waterfront. "We will 
> seek to prevent any inappropriate interim uses....We are serving notice 
> that we do not intend to wait to pursue immediate opportunities for 
> job growth and for public access to the shoreline."
> 
> A SOLAR SUBWAY?
> According to Brooklyn's Currier-Life Publications, solar panels will 
> be installed on the new Coney Island terminal of four subway lines. 
> The panels will be used to capture and distribute heat within the 
> station. The newly designed arched elevated station will replace the 
> dingy Stillwell Avenue Terminal that is long overdue for an upgrade. 
> Local officials have linked the changes to the arrival of a minor 
> league baseball franchise, now dubbed the Brooklyn Cyclones.
> 
> WWW.TREEBANCH.COM CLIMBS QUICKLY
> A national survey of over 100,000 business and organizational web 
> sites puts www.treebranch.com in the top five percent of "linked-to" 
> sites. Our computer's counter indicates that we average over 500 hits 
> a week. This means that many public interest groups in and out of NYC 
> find the information that we present to be of general interest to 
> their readers. It also allows us, with our "Hub for the Urban 
> Environment" to send seekers to other places to learn how to build a 
> softer, greener, more livable city. Our web presence is a recent 
> addition to our communications program, and thus we are pleased with 
> the quick acknowledgement of its value. We thank those who have 
> recognized its relevance. We will continue to build and perfect it 
> over the coming years.
> 
> URBAN OUTDOORS ADVENTURES
> Visit www.treebranch.com for hundreds of great events or more 
> information about our Urban Outdoors. Add your event to our calendar.
> 
> Saturday, January 6 2001, Land Water and Sky Walk. From Sheepshead 
> Bay to Floyd Bennett Field. Highlights include the fishing harbor, 
> sand dunes of Plumb beach, wildlife area and pond, and the location 
> for restoration of historic aircraft in NYC. Meet 10am at Sheepshead 
> Bay Road exit of the Sheepshead Bay station of the "D" train. Free, 
> Precipitation or wind chill conditions below 25 degrees at 8 am 
> cancels. Take transit-not a circular walk. Info: 212-352-9330.
> 
> Saturday, January 13, 2001, Hiking the Cold Winter Sands. The dunes 
> of Fort Tilden provide sun-traps and microclimates that are warmer 
> than the nearby seashore.. Meet at Gateway National Recreation Area, 
> Fort Tilden ranger station, (#35 Green Bus Lines from Flatbush Ave 
> (Brooklyn College Station) #2 or 5 train) Free, John Gallagher Leads, 
> Info: 718-499-9779.
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> ---------------
> Your $35 check to Neighborhood Open Space Coalition helps protect 
> NYC's quality of life and keeps Urban Outdoors coming.
> 
> Become a year 2001 Member Now!
> 
> [   ] I'd like to be a member of Neighborhood Open Space Coalition  
> ($35)
> [   ] I'd like to join Friends of Gateway ($35)
> [   ] I'd like to be a member of both NOSC and FoG (Joint Membership 
> $50)
> [   ] I'd like to make a contribution.  $...................
> 
> Name..................................................................
> .....
> 
> Address...............................................................
> ......
> 
> City..................................State.............Zip...........
> ......
> 
> e-mail....................................................
> 
> Phone (..........)..................           
> Fax(..........).....................
> 
> Organization....................................................... 
> Neighborhood Open Space Coalition / Friends of Gateway
> 356 Seventh Avenue  New York NY 10001  212.352.9330
> Fax: 212-352-9338	e-mail: dave.lutz@treebranch.com
> 
> URBAN OUTDOORS is the monthly newsletter of Neighborhood Open Space 
> Coalition and Friends of Gateway. It reports on citywide public space 
> issues and the work of hundreds of local civic groups that take an 
> interest in the spaces. To add someone to URBAN OUTDOORS subscriber 
> list: Send their name and e-mail address to nosc@treebranch.com. To 
> be removed from the list write: "unsubscribe urban outdoors" to the 
> same address. If you receive this newsletter by fax: write 
> "unsubscribe" on the COVER sheet and fax it back to 212-352-9338.  

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