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Be sure that your garden is conducive to participation byhandicapped folks

  • Subject: [cg] Be sure that your garden is conducive to participation byhandicapped folks
  • From: adam36055@aol.com
  • Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 22:06:20 -0500

 Just a thought - 
 
But when laying out your garden, and thinking about your governance, see yourselves as having trouble getting around, reaching things, communicating with others. 
 
In other words - don't have a special section in your garden of accessible beds - in other words, if you can spread them out so it ain't the "accessible neighborhood," so there's no feeling of marginalization. Also, when you're designing the shed, make it so someone in a chair or who is having a hard time getting around can get the tools they need without having to ask for them from someone able bodied - and to have the long handled tools in good repair. 
 
Also, be sure to include, to ask, to require differently abled people ( see I can euphemize too!) to do garden chores, to their abilities, engage in fundraising, information tables, garden tours and everything else other gardeners do.  It's easy to say and to ignore what people can do when you assume what they can't.  Small compost bins as well as large always need to be stirred. 
 
 
The most important part of a community garden is its heart - be sure you give yourself the real opportunity to get some extraordinary people on your team by giving them jobs to do.  
 
Just help what needs helping, but make sure that everyone has the chance to participate according to their abilities. 
 
Best, 
Adam Honigman
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Call <jimcall@casagarden.com>
To: jsalans@aol.com; billm@WoodRodgers.com; agrenner@artsci.wustl.edu; community_garden@mallorn.com
Sent: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 20:10:07 -0600
Subject: RE: [cg] designs for handicapped accessible beds?


Josh,
Here is an another option,  see at... http://www.casagarden.com/rotary.htm

Redwood is a great choice, but kind of expensive.  The only thing I don't
like about it is... it rots.  Wood exposed to water, soil and the elements
will eventually break down.  Our beds will be around long after you and your
grandchildren have passed away. The caps on our beds are composed of
recycled plastic (I think 2" x 10").

We do have to replace the soaker hoses every couple of years.  These beds
are on a dedicated irrigation zone (sprinkler system).  During the hot
Alabama summer, I have the beds turning on at 4 am and 1 pm.  One of the
cons of raised beds is that they require more water.  One of the pros is
that they heat up earlier in the spring and longer in late fall.  Remember
to bury your soaker hoses under a layer of leaf mulch.  This cuts down on
deterioration.  Another thing, we drilled several holes in the bottom of the
beds to provide drainage.

The beds are built according to ADA standards.  They are 26" high and the
beds are within arm reach for the gardener (edge to center).  The photos
don't display it, but we have special hardwood mulch surrounding the beds.
The mulch is specially cut to compact so that wheelchair gardeners can
easily navigate around them. Some folks call it wood carpet.  We have to
refresh it periodically.  No big deal.

Our beds are on the expensive side but in the long run, I believe they will
be worth it.  Our local Rotary Club paid for and built these beds.  What a
deal!

I think you have a good design... just trying to give you another option.

Good luck on your efforts.

Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of jsalans@aol.com
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2006 4:31 PM
To: billm@WoodRodgers.com; agrenner@artsci.wustl.edu;
community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: Re: [cg] designs for handicapped accessible beds?


At least on paper our design for raised handicapped accessible beds are as
follows:
We are making 4' x 8' beds 20 inches high out of rough redwood.

The sides are stacked:
4 - 2 x 10' - 8'
4 - 2 x 10 - 4'

4 -  4" x 4" posts 28" high so that they hold the box together at the
corners (inside the box) from the top to 8 inches extending into the ground
below.

6 - 2" x 4" - 28" high to be screwed onto the 8' outsides at 3' & 6'
intervals - 2 per side, and one on each side of the 4' width at the 3'
interval. These will have points at the base for banging into the ground 8",
then they will be screwed into the beds.

2" x 6" railing screwed into the top of all sides for sitting on the bed.

Josh


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Maynard <billm@WoodRodgers.com>
To: agrenner@artsci.wustl.edu; community_garden@mallorn.com
Sent: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 13:34:04 -0800
Subject: RE: [cg] designs for handicapped accessible beds?


In sacramento, we have a water service to each ADA raised bed... a
soaker hose or drip system can be then connected and if needed a timer

Bill Maynard
Acga board - sacramento


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's
services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find
out
how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's
services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find
out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's 
services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out 
how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





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