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Re: c.g. or allotment?

  • Subject: Re: [cg] c.g. or allotment?
  • From: "Lenny Librizzi" plantlot@rcn.com
  • Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2005 15:47:07 -0400

The only allotment gardens I have seen were in Malmo, Sweden. The gardens there are large and each person purchases the deed for the individual allotment. When the time comes the allotment can be resold. Most of them have cottages on them with different levels of comfort. There is also a common area and some common governance.
I have not seen anything like that in this country.
I am reading a new book called City Bountiful : A Century of Community Gardening In America by Laura Lawson (who will be speaking at the ACGA conference in Minneapolis). Kristin, I would recommend this book for your research. Laura covers the early Vacant Lot Improvement Gardens from the 1890's on in Philadelphia and other cities that were created during the periodic depressions that occurred back then. In fact Libby and I were interviewed for the book. Some of those gardens were large but most did not allow structures because the gardens were not permanent. History keeps repeating.

Lenny


On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 11:53:19 -0400, Libby J. Goldstein <libby@igc.org> wrote:

Jack,


Actually, Philadelphia had a "Vacant Lot Improvement" program in the late 19th Century. It provided plots on vacant land (I think they were 1/7 acre) so poor people who were victims of a great depression then to grow their own food.

I have a piece on it at City Farmer.

Libby


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The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


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