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Re: advice needed on mulch for paths (Jude Carson)

  • Subject: [cg] Re: advice needed on mulch for paths (Jude Carson)
  • From: Don Boekelheide dboekelheide@yahoo.com
  • Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2006 20:20:32 -0700 (PDT)

Hey, Jude,

I'm coming to agree with Fred about wood chip mulch
for paths (we get the rain after you all in Atlanta -
Charlotte is dripping tonight, and we need it!).

We get free wood chip mulch from our county's yard
waste facility, and it is good stuff, made from
ground-up shipping pallets (hardwood, no weeds, looks
nice). But even at 6 in (15 cm) coverage, weeds are
still a problem and our mulched paths take constant
attention. We also have mixed results getting
gardeners to keep paths clean and weeded, and I end up
walking around with my mower every month or so.

Another benefit to grassed paths, which we used a lot
out in California, is that the grass/path-plants pick
up plant nutrients so they don't leach. You can
recapture these nutrients by composting the clippings
in your compost pile (or you can simply grasscycle and
keep them cycling in the living plants).

The disadvantage to grass/volunteer plants paths is
that you have to establish them and keep them mowed.
In high traffic areas, it may not work, and you may
need to go with some kind of alternative, including
woodchip mulch.

We got given some cedar chips a couple years back, and
people used them without problems not only on paths
but also to mulch veggies and flowers growing in beds.
It did smell a little like a hamster cage, though.

Good luck,

Don Boekelheide
Charlotte, NC

>   1. advice needed on mulch for paths (Jude Carson)

> Message: 1
> From: "Jude Carson" <cleobar@nbnet.nb.ca>
> To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2006 08:03:17 -0300
> Subject: [cg] advice needed on mulch for paths
> 
> Hi all;
> 
> Here in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, where the
> rain hasn't stopped yet
> this season, we have an ongoing problem with the
> garden paths being overgrown
> with weeds. It is a constant battle to "persuade"
> gardeners to weed their
> paths as well as their beds. Any suggestions for an
> effective mulch would be
> appreciated. Would wood chips be OK, as long as
> they're not cedar? Cheers,
> 
> Jude Carson
> 
> 
> --__--__--
> 
> Message: 2
> Subject: RE: [cg] advice needed on mulch for paths
> Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2006 08:12:31 -0400
> From: "Fred Conrad" <fred.conrad@acfb.org>
> To: "Jude Carson" <cleobar@nbnet.nb.ca>,
> <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> 
> Jude,
> 
> it's raining here, too.  which is nice for us since
> we've been in a dry spell since early march.  my
> sweet corn tassled at 4' and the rows of okra looked
> like cheap holloween decor.  
> 
> in some cases mowing the paths can be the easiest
> way to maintain them.  of course, i don't know how
> heavy the foot/wheelbarrow traffic is, so that could
> well leave muddy spots.  we have a garden here that
> mulched and mulched until the mulch reached the top
> of the wood-framed beds and then we excavated it,
> composted it, and just allowed the (in this case
> roughly 3 foot) pathways to grass over by
> themselves.  this has been about five years and it's
> been much easier to maintain.  if you need it to
> look nice for a visit or photo opp, it only takes
> one person a few minutes to make the whole thing
> look neat and tidy.
> fgc
> 
> Fred Conrad
> Community Garden Coordinator
> Atlanta Community Food Bank
> 732 Joseph E Lowery Blvd, NW, Atlanta, GA 30318
> ph: 678.553.5932 fx: 678.553.5933
> fred.conrad@acfb.org    <http://www.acfb.org> 
> Our mission is to fight hunger by engaging,
> educating and empowering our community. 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
> [mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf
> Of Jude Carson
> Sent: Monday, June 26, 2006 7:03 AM
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Subject: [cg] advice needed on mulch for paths
> 
> 
> Hi all;
> 
> Here in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, where the
> rain hasn't stopped yet
> this season, we have an ongoing problem with the
> garden paths being overgrown
> with weeds. It is a constant battle to "persuade"
> gardeners to weed their
> paths as well as their beds. Any suggestions for an
> effective mulch would be
> appreciated. Would wood chips be OK, as long as
> they're not cedar? Cheers,
> 
> Jude Carson
> 
> 
>
______________________________________________________
> The American Community Gardening Association
> listserve is only one of ACGA's services to
> community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA
> and to find out how to join, please go to
> http://www.communitygarden.org
> 
> 
> To post an e-mail to the list: 
> community_garden@mallorn.com
> 
> To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your
> subscription: 
>
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
> 
> 
> --__--__--
> 
> Message: 3
> d=igc.org;
>
b=QVLrs8lUArd7scFjSE8OqGjpC8SCAyav2GEgxjJ4nedKnvWLlxlIXFwc6N4sezFe;
> Cc: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> From: "Libby J. Goldstein" <libby@igc.org>
> Subject: Re: [cg] advice needed on mulch for paths
> Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2006 09:53:52 -0400
> To: "Jude Carson" <cleobar@nbnet.nb.ca>
> 
> Jude,
> 
> I don't know why you'd object to cedar. It's a
> fairly decent insect 
> deterrent. But that's neither here nor there. One
> way to keep the weeds 
> down is to lay plastic , pin it down and then cover
> it with chips or 
> salt hay.
> 
> Libby
> > Hi all;
> >
> > Here in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, where
> the rain hasn't 
> > stopped yet
> > this season, we have an ongoing problem with the
> garden paths being 
> > overgrown
> > with weeds. It is a constant battle to "persuade"
> gardeners to weed 
> > their
> > paths as well as their beds. Any suggestions for
> an effective mulch 
> > would be
> > appreciated. Would wood chips be OK, as long as
> they're not cedar? 
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Jude Carson
> 
> 
> --__--__--
> 
> Message: 4
> Reply-To: "Mike McGrath" <MikeMcG@PTD.net>
> From: "Mike McGrath" <MikeMcG@PTD.net>
> To: "Jude Carson" <cleobar@nbnet.nb.ca>,
> <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Subject: Re: [cg] advice needed on mulch for paths
> Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2006 10:22:32 -0400
> reply-type=original
> 
> yes--that's their best use, in fact.
>                                             ---Mike
> McG in PA
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Jude Carson" <cleobar@nbnet.nb.ca>
> To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Sent: Monday, June 26, 2006 7:03 AM
> Subject: [cg] advice needed on mulch for paths
> 
> 
=== message truncated ===


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

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