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Unframed raised beds as alternative to CCA-treated wood


At 04:33 PM 03/27/2000 EST, you wrote:
>I'm very glad to see this thread. Charlotte is addicted to CCA. Disposal is 
>as  a problem as use, I'm afraid.
>
>Another alternative locally is native stone, which is heavy but may be 
>available close by for free or very cheap. 'Dry stack' is becoming more 
>popular-and can be considered 'recycling', since stone was used locally for 
>fences for generations. 
>
>Often, esp. with veggie gardens, 'edging' raised beds is not necessary. The 
>'raised beds' of Alan Chadwick and Asian gardeners, and African ridged 
>gardens, are not boxed or stoned, but simply worked soil piled up and not 
>walked on.

Good point, Don.  But unframed raised beds often wash before seeds
germinate, especially with spring's often torrential rains.  And clearly
defined beds are usually easier for folks to maintain, and easier to keep
paths clear, in a community setting.  And children have a much easier time
differentiating between the growing bed is and the pathway.

But you're certainly correct to suggest that framed beds, when the option
for framing material is treated lumber, is not always necessary.

Dawn



******************************

Dawn M. Ripley
Holdfast Farm
5561 Budd Road
New Albany, Indiana  47150-9109
(812) 949-9008					

ripley@iglou.com
www.members.iglou.com/ripley


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