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From the Heifer Project on Urban Greening and crime

  • Subject: [cg] From the Heifer Project on Urban Greening and crime
  • From: Adam36055@aol.com
  • Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 19:17:39 EST

In a message dated 3/14/03 7:23:45 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
jesse.strassburg@HEIFER.ORG writes:

<< ubj:  Urban Greening and crime
 Date:  3/14/03 7:23:45 PM Eastern Standard Time
 From:  jesse.strassburg@HEIFER.ORG (Jesse Strassburg)
 Sender:
 
 >>For more on cgs/urban greening and crime, see studies done at  U of
 >>Illinois
 >>  http://www.herl.uiuc.edu/canopy.htm
 >>
 >>Here's a synopsis of one of the studies.  Others include"Girls  and
 >>Greenery", "Kids and Concentration", "Neighbors              and nature",
 >>"Plants and Poverty" and Vegetation and Violence". All are available from
 >>this same link.
 >>
 >>
 >>Green  Streets, Not Mean Streets
 >>Vegetation May Cut Crime in the Inner City
 >>
 >>A study of   a Chicago public housing development by University of Illinois
 >>researchers Frances E. Kuo and William C. Sullivan has found that apartment
 >>buildings surrounded by trees and greenery are dramatically safer than
 >>buildings devoid of green. The greener the surroundings, the fewer crimes
 >>occur against people and property.
 >>
 >>Compared with apartment buildings that had little or no vegetation,
 >>buildings with high levels of greenery had 52 percent fewer total crimes,
 >>including 48 percent  fewer property crimes and 56 percent fewer violent
 >>crimes. Even modest amounts  of greenery were associated with lower crime
 >>rates. Several factors combine  to explain why this is so.
 >>
 >>Greenery helps  people to relax and renew, reducing aggression. Green 
spaces
 >>bring people   together outdoors. Their presence increases surveillance and
 >>discourages criminals. The green and groomed appearance of an apartment
 >>building is a  cue that owners and residents care about a property, and
 >>watch over it and each other.
 >>
 >>The information  in this bulletin is from (Environment and Crime in the
 >>Inner City: Does Vegetation  Reduce Crime?) Environment and Behavior . Vol.
 >>33 No. 3, May 2001.       343-367.
 >> Copyright 2001 Sage Publications, Inc.
 
  >>

--- Begin Message ---
  • Subject: Urban Greening and crime
  • From: Jesse Strassburg jesse.strassburg@HEIFER.ORG
  • Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 18:13:00 -0800
  • Comments: RFC822 error: Incorrect or incomplete address field found and ignored.
For more on cgs/urban greening and crime, see studies done at  U of
Illinois
 http://www.herl.uiuc.edu/canopy.htm

Here's a synopsis of one of the studies.  Others include"Girls  and
Greenery", "Kids and Concentration", "Neighbors              and nature",
"Plants and Poverty" and Vegetation and Violence". All are available from
this same link.


Green  Streets, Not Mean Streets
Vegetation May Cut Crime in the Inner City

A study of   a Chicago public housing development by University of Illinois
researchers Frances E. Kuo and William C. Sullivan has found that apartment
buildings surrounded by trees and greenery are dramatically safer than
buildings devoid of green. The greener the surroundings, the fewer crimes
occur against people and property.

Compared with apartment buildings that had little or no vegetation,
buildings with high levels of greenery had 52 percent fewer total crimes,
including 48 percent  fewer property crimes and 56 percent fewer violent
crimes. Even modest amounts  of greenery were associated with lower crime
rates. Several factors combine  to explain why this is so.

Greenery helps  people to relax and renew, reducing aggression. Green spaces
bring people   together outdoors. Their presence increases surveillance and
discourages criminals. The green and groomed appearance of an apartment
building is a  cue that owners and residents care about a property, and
watch over it and each other.

The information  in this bulletin is from (Environment and Crime in the
Inner City: Does Vegetation  Reduce Crime?) Environment and Behavior . Vol .
33 No. 3, May 2001.       343-367.
 Copyright 2001 Sage Publications, Inc.
--- End Message ---




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