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Re: Community Gardens

  • Subject: [cg] Re: Community Gardens
  • From: Adam36055@aol.com
  • Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 16:07:51 EST

Max, 

In addition to answering you, I am forwarding your query and my response to 
the American Community Gardening Association listserve so community garden 
organizers and master gardeners near USC Santa Cruz can also get in touch 
with you (though you'd be better off taking the initiative contacting them 
directly.) 

Re: "Gardens could help  create more cross-campus and college based unity, 
community  structure, positive work environments, positive student 
activities, 
 and provide food for the dining halls.  At UCSC there is an arboretum  and 
the Student Environmental Center has an excellent Gardening Club  and Seed 
Co-op; so students do have the opportunity to take part in  gardening.   I 
guess, what I am curious to know is if you have any  suggestions on how a 
college-based (or campus-central) community  garden program would be 
structured, if you know of any universities  that have good community garden 
programs, and what resources you 
 could recommend.

University community gardens are an old story - the longest running one I 
know of is at the University of Wisconsin, Madision - the Eagle Heights 
Community Garden that has been continuously operated since 1962.  Here is the 
link to their website: http://www.sit.wisc.edu/~ehgarden/

I know that you are a busy person, but take an evening out of your schedule, 
make yourself a pot of your favorite hot beverage, put paper in your printer 
and go to the American Community Gardening Association Website, which is 
literally chock full of i information on community gardening:  <A 
HREF="http://www.communitygarden.org/";>American Community Gardening 
Association</A> 

Of particular interest is the links page, which connect to the websites of 
garden organizations throughout the US and Canada.  The California section, 
as you might imagine, is rather impressive, but we have links to 
organizations above the tundra, Europe,  South America & Asia.  The ACGA  
listserv that I've copied this to gets information requests from the Middle 
East and Africa as well.

Please read through the ACGA website, come up with some questions and respond 
to community_garden@mallorn.com ( there's information on the ACGA website on 
how to subscribe to this free listserv.) 

The section - "How to Start A Community Garden" is very well thought out. 
Read and enjoy!

Best wishes,
Adam Honigman
Volunteer,  <A HREF="http://www.clintoncommunitygarden.org/";>Clinton 
Community Garden</A>  


 

 

<< Subj:     Community Gardens
 Date:  3/27/03 2:59:12 PM Eastern Standard Time
 From:  mwax@ucsc.edu (Matt Waxman)
 To:    Adam36055@aol.com
 
 Hi Adam,
 
 I just read your e-mail on the Public Spaces listserve and am really 
 interested in learning more about how community gardens can work to 
 literally grow community.  I am the Intern for the Campus and 
 Community Planning office at UC Santa Cruz and have recently begun to 
 learn more about how gardens can foster positive spaces.  Students 
 on-campus at UCSC live within ten different colleges that are 
 situated around a college academic core.  Our campus, like other 
 college campuses, is essentially a small city.  Gardens could help 
 create more cross-campus and college based unity, community 
 structure, positive work environments, positive student activities, 
 and provide food for the dining halls.  At UCSC there is an arboretum 
 and the Student Environmental Center has an excellent Gardening Club 
 and Seed Co-op; so students do have the opportunity to take part in 
 gardening.   I guess, what I am curious to know is if you have any 
 suggestions on how a college-based (or campus-central) community 
 garden program would be structured, if you know of any universities 
 that have good community garden programs, and what resources you 
 could recommend.
 
 Thank You!,
 -Matt
 
 Matt Waxman
 Campus & Community Planning Intern
 Campus & Community Planning, UCSC
 515 Swift Street
 Santa Cruz, CA 95060
 e-mail: mwax@ucsc.edu
 tel# (831) 502-0706
 
  >>

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

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