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Re: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1220 - 2 msgs

  • Subject: [cg] Re: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1220 - 2 msgs
  • From: "Diane Dodge" dianefaydodge@hotmail.com
  • Date: Sun, 10 Nov 2002 15:08:21 -0600

OOPS!  About midway down the paragraph I wrote about hydrangeas, it says....... "I usually BUT the stems"....my left index finger was trying too hard, I guess............I meant CUT!   Lisa's advice about zones is very important, as was her advice about early spring and late fall pruning.        Diane

>From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
>Reply-To: community_garden@mallorn.com
>To: community_garden@mallorn.com
>Subject: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1220 - 2 msgs
>Date: Sun, 10 Nov 2002 12:00:05 -0600
>
>
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>Today's Topics:
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> 1. Hydrangea pruning (lisa vandyke)
> 2. Hydrangea help (Diane Dodge)
>
>--__--__--
>
>Message: 1
>From: "lisa vandyke"
>To: community_garden@mallorn.com
>Date: Sat, 09 Nov 2002 12:43:02 -0600
>Subject: [cg] Hydrangea pruning
>
>
>

Hi Laura,

>

>I have a pee wee hydrangea. I would like to know when I should prune the

>
>

>blooms from the summer off????

>
>

>I also have a hydrangea bush that I must have pruned at the wrong time of

>
>

>year because this summer I got many beautiful leaves but no blooms, when

>
>

>should these plants be pruned???

>

First I must remind folks to include zone/region info when asking questions like this - too many answers are climate-dependent. H. paniculata - the Pee Wee or Pee Gee blooms on the current season's growth, therefore you can prune it at any time, thought late fall or early spring are preferred. If you are pruning hard (down to the lowest buds) you will get fewer, but larger flowers. I am assuming that the other hydrangea is a large leaf variety, and the lack of flowering leads me to guess that you are in a more northern zone where the plant is borderline. Large-leaf hydrangeas bloom on last year's wood, so if the buds die off during the winter, you lose the flowers. Or if you prune back too far, you are cutting off the flowers. Prune these in the spring and make sure you keep the fattest buds, if they overwinter.Best of luck, Laura.

>

Lisa in Mpls

>
>
>


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>--__--__--
>
>Message: 2
>From: "Diane Dodge"
>To: zola@optonline.net
>Cc: community_garden@mallorn.com
>Date: Sat, 09 Nov 2002 17:11:08 -0600
>Subject: [cg] Hydrangea help
>
>
>

Hi Laura,

>

I assume you mean "peegee" hydrangea.  Several questions--is the plant in full or nearly full sun?  It does best in full sun.  In any case, a peegee hydrangea blooms on new wood, so the best time to prune the branches is in spring. Fall pruning encourages shoot growth, the shoots are usually too weak to survive winter, and the entire plant will suffer from putting it's resources into new growth instead of into it's root system.  But you can pick off just the blooms now if you like.  I usually but the stems of peegees at the peak of their blooming,just when they begin to get a pink blush(August in Minnesota), hang them upside down in a dark, warm and dry place, and they last for years as spectacular dried arrangement.  Another thing, most perennials have an "off" year once in awhile.  Not to worry if you don't get the same performance from your plants every year--they're living things, and all us living things have our ups and downs.

>

Happy gardening,

>

Diane Dodge



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