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RE: Chefs in a Garden

Title: RE: Chefs in a Garden

RE: Kevin's mesas age: I love it when this happens!  Our Chefs in a Garden event spawned theirs.  Here's more info on ours.

10-12 premiere St. Louis chefs prepare dishes on site from ingredients grown in community gardens. The dishes are between tasting portions and a luncheon serving.  The chefs contribute all ingredients not grown in gardens, i.e. meats, fish, cheeses.  Gateway provides cooking station equipment and rented linens, glassware, etc, fresh produce, Chefs gifts, elegant cookbook of all dishes, advertising.  Arts Commandos assist chefs and buss.  Flowers donated by local grower, Wild Thangs.

Local beers and wines provided.

Event held at Edward Jones Headquarters in their 4 story glass atrium, donated.  Corporate sponsorships at $2,500,$5,000, $10,000 levels.  Individual sponsors, $300, $600, and $1200.  $100 per ticket for non-sponsors.

Slide show and website on display, no talking, no intros, no side auctions, just good times. 

In its fifth year and growing.

My favorite fund raiser done by a community garden group has to be the DUG pumpkin toss.  Now there is a successful gig!  Check it out on their website!  www.dug.org

Cheers, Gwenne

-----Original Message-----
From: Honigman, Adam [mailto:Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com]
Sent: Friday, October 26, 2001 4:46 PM
To: 'Kevin Webb'; Ginger Ogilvie; community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: [cg] Shameless Fundraising Tips

Re Kevin's issue:  We set the cost of the tickets at
$30. Our biggest set-back has been getting the word
out and thus the tickets sold.

The ultimate benefit of a 501(c) (3) : Rich people love sentences like, "The
Sloppy Dahlia Community Garden is  not-for-profit IRS 501(c) (3) charitable
corporation." Even marginally middle class people like myself like it too,
especially around tax time. If it's more than nickel and dime contributions
you want to collect, incorporate as a 501(c)(3).

On media: You probably took pictures of the restaurant fundraiser with shots
of the contributors in fancy clothes looking at your local gardens as well
as have  the guest list already transferred into the mailmerge you used when
you sent the attendees thank you notes- if you haven't, you should plan on
doing it next year.

If you took pictures, you should write a note to your local garden and
society columnists in local newspapers with whatever information you have
printed up about your gardens. The gist of your letter is that:

1) They are invited and can eat and drink for free as members of the press,
the quid pro quo is...

2) Pre and post-event coverage of this marvelous, new social/horticultural

Another route is to find a local religious institution with ritzy
parishoners whose jewelry clanks as they open their hymnals. Join it.  Any
religious institution's parishoner base improves dramatically when community
gardeners join up. When these wonderful, free altar flowers start showing up
from local community garden's specially dedicated cutting beds, you have to
invite the nice priest, parson, vicar, cardinal, rabbi, mullah, druid to tea
in your garden. If you have a pretty space, you can suggest it as a possible
alternative venue for summer weddings, wedding receptions, whatever. Explain
that as a volunteer organization, you depend on contributions and that
anything of that type would be greatly appreciated. Also, you might like
access, if at all possible to membership lists, and an occasional
acknowledgement from the pulpit or in the newsletter that the altar flowers
came from __________Community Garden that is doing a fundraiser

This is in addition to the wonderful all cotton garden t-shirts, coffee
mugs, special garden honey with _________Community Garden logo and year on
it that you sell at block fairs, garden barbecues and hand out, sparingly,
to garden and social page journalists as well as helpful politicians.

Get the idea?

Best wishes,
Adam Honigman
Still hoarse from selling lotsa Clinton Community Garden t-shirts, coffee
mugs, baseball hats, key rings and honey last Saturday afternoon to every
one who walked by on Manhattan's West 48th Street...  

-----Original Message-----
From: Kevin Webb [mailto:worldwidewebb01@yahoo.com]
Sent: Friday, October 26, 2001 5:10 PM
To: Ginger Ogilvie; community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: Re: [cg] Fundraising

One of our more succesful fundraisers here in
Columbia, MO is our 'Chefs in the Garden Tour and
Dinner'. We partner with a local restaurant with an
upscale (culinarily speaking) reputation to cook a
benefit dinner from produce out of the gardens and
from local farms. We target the folks with money,
sensitive palates, and a taste for local food cooked
in season.

If you can talk the restaurant into free or cheap use
of their facilities (we've always done the event on a
Sunday when the restaurant was otherwise closed, hence
they don't lose business) and get most or all of your
produce donated, the costs are pretty low. We do a
tour the same day of a mixture of community and
private gardens. We set the cost of the tickets at
$30. Our biggest set-back has been getting the word
out and thus the tickets sold.

Hope this helps-

Community Garden Coalition
Columbia, MO
--- Ginger Ogilvie <community@wasatchgardens.org>
> Hi all. WCG is in the process of evaluating our
> fundraising efforts through
> large events. In the past we have put on a large
> plant sale in early July
> where we have gleaned plants from wholesale
> nurseries that are about to shut
> down operations for the year. This has been
> successful, but extremely taxing
> on our staff and volunteers, and actually
> (surprise!) July is not really a
> good time for planting leggy petunias in Utah. As we
> think about refining
> our approach for this event, we'd also like to
> consider other things that
> may assist us in fundraising efforts.
> I thought I would come to this list and ask if you
> could share an example or
> two of solid fundraising events. Let us know about
> creative things that have
> grown out of your unique community. Tell us if that
> Rhodendrum Run in 1994
> was a good idea but didn't work out because the
> timing was off... Do any of
> you have formal black tie sorts of things in your
> gardens? Any sort of tips
> or ideas that you'd like to share would be great. If
> you'd like to reply off
> list, my email address is below... Thanks!
> Ginger Ogilvie
> Community Gardening Coordinator
> Wasatch Community Gardens
> (801) 359-2658 phone/fax (801) 322-4810
> 350 South 400 East Suite 101B
> Salt Lake City, UT 84111
> community@wasatchgardens.org
> www.wasatchgardens.org
> _______________________________________________
> community_garden maillist  -
> community_garden@mallorn.com

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