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Re: Contaminated soil...

  • Subject: Re: [cg] Contaminated soil...
  • From: "Lenny Librizzi" plantlot@rcn.com
  • Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2005 16:12:21 -0400

I don't think we have ever had a situation like this where a city was underwater (and parts still are) for weeks. The water was contaminated with sewage, petroleum products, industrial chemicals, salt from the sea and probably stuuf we don't know about yet. Once the water is removed some of that stuff will remain in the soil. I can't imagine that soil being safe for vegetable gardening and it might be hazardous just to be working in.
It will be a fertile ground for the remediation scientists. Maybe earthworms might be one of the solutions. I just read an interesting book, The Earth Moved : On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms, by Amy Stewart and she writes about worms being used in some remediations including removing the odor from biosolids (dried sewage sludge. Should we be sending worms from our compost piles to help start the soil healing process?

Lenny Librizzi

On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 13:27:34 -0400, Amanda M. Edmonds <amandamedmonds@gmail.com> wrote:

I agree, Dorene et al, about needing to figure out about soil readiness
and contamination.

Has anyone ever seen studies/datas/stories about soil issues
post-flooding or post-storms? Clearly, there's huge potential for
contamination in the most urban areas... I wonder what the case is for
less urban places that mostly got the big water surge from the storm,
but didn't sustain flooding? I'm looking into some of the research
journals and extension bulletins to see what has been said-- but this
is definitely not my area of expertise. Who else on this list has
ideas around this?

And, I'll re-pose the question as to what role people think ACGA as a
bi-national network of gardeners can best play in addition to
supporting food security relief efforts of Second Harvest, et al?
Potentially finding support (financial/donated/etc) for soil testing
for some of these communities could be an idea, so that as people
rebuild it can be in healthy conditions... I know that we often feel
cash strapped to do the heavy metal and more advanced soil tests here--
I could only imagine people in communities needing to rebuild from
scratch may not be able to prioritize that sort of diagnostics. Or,
should we try to garner more support for the efforts of Don and others
in Dallas-- and areas closer to the affected region who are working to
grow more fresh food for the relief effort? Don, KUDOS to you and your
community for digging in so quickly and providing such nutritious food
for the communities down there. How best could we from elsewhere
support what you're doing?

Amanda

Amanda Maria Edmonds
Executive Director, Growing Hope
amanda@growinghope.net
734.330.7576

"We must be the change we wish to see in the world."
"To forget to dig the earth and to tend the soil is to forget
ourselves."
-Mahatma Ghandi



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The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


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