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RE: decontamination of soil

  • Subject: RE: [cg] decontamination of soil
  • From: "Corrie Zoll" czoll@greeninstitute.org
  • Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2005 07:41:01 -0500
  • Content-class: urn:content-classes:message
  • Thread-index: AcXAtVvski1HQmbsS36i2gBvD/E/JwB4UdDg
  • Thread-topic: [cg] decontamination of soil

There may be some contaminants that are broken down into organic materials by plants or worms, but I do know that heavy metals don't just disappear when plants are used to remove them from the soil.  In properly planned phytoremediation projects, plant material is removed before it sets fruit and the plant material is placed in a toxic waste landfil or incinerated in a smelter to remove the heavy metals.  In poorly planned phytoremediation projects, plants like sunflowers or corn (which are good at taking up lead) are planted and allowed to fruit so that birds and other animals eat the toxic seeds, sickening the wildlife and then redistributing the contamination in the environment.

-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of
Minifarms@aol.com
Sent: Friday, September 23, 2005 10:14 PM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: [cg] decontamination of soil


Just came across the following:  
 
A winter clover known as berseem clover proved to be effective at  removing  
heavy metals from soil.   I do not know how this  variety would grow in NO.
 
Ken Hargesheimer


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