hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Curious Me

  • Subject: Re: [ferns] Curious Me
  • From: Duane & Dixie Petersen dpetersen11@cox.net
  • Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 21:55:29 -0500

Nope, it doesn't have the identical genetic expressions as the parent. 
All multicell creatures have two chromosomes with the potential for
differing traits on each of those chromosomes.  While the offspring of
self fertilization would share a larger percentage of traits with the
parent than with normal fertilization, there is still the potential for
vast difference in appearance and function (for instance it might
inherit chromosome 1 a or b, and chromosome 2 a or b etc.  Figuring that
a plant may have 30-300 different chromosomes all with genes for various
functions, you can see that there is still plenty of room for variation
even in a closed system.  The danger in this closed system is that the
new individual stands a much greater chance of inheriting recessive
lethal or detrimental genes which might impair function and may cause
death.  D. Petersen

Clones share 100% the same genetic material.  

Bob Needham wrote:
> 
> A bit off subject for the FernFolk, but:
> 
> If a flowering plant is fertilized with it's own pollen,
> is the new plant a "clone" (i.e. genetically indentical)
> to the "parent" plant?
> 
> (Sorry to be so "Heretical" talking about flowers and such ilk on fernet!)
> 
> -BN
> 
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
> message text UNSUBSCRIBE FERNS

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
message text UNSUBSCRIBE FERNS



Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement