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Re: Pteris umbrosa R.Br. A new country record?

  • Subject: Re: Pteris umbrosa R.Br. A new country record?
  • From: " Barry White" <barry_white1@msn.com.au>
  • Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2010 16:18:53 +1100

Hello Brian,

That is a nice specimen of Pteris umbrosa. It occurs here in Victoria in East Gippsland and up along the coast of NSW and Qld in moist rainforest. It is a handsome fern and quite hardy.

Barry White

----- Original Message ----- From: "Brian Swale" <bj@caverock.net.nz>
To: <ferns@hort.net>
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2010 9:16 PM
Subject: [ferns] Pteris umbrosa R.Br. A new country record?

Some 6 - 7 - 8 years ago I grew a fern from a prothallus I found at the base
of a baby cycad I bought in a local store.

It grew, self-fertilised, and the sporophyte developed into a distinctive,
handsome plant.  In good sun behind a warm window it grew very rapidly,
and produced masses of brown spores.

My identification was (and still is) Pteris umbrosa from Australia.

Eventually, this plant died one summer week when it used up all its water
and I didn't notice.  But its spores stayed dormant in a cactus pot that I
neglected, but when I began to water the cactus more; what showed up
again after ?? 6 years, but this fern.

Separately, late last year, I had an enquiry from a person living about 800km
north of where I do, asking about the ID of a fern plant she had collected
under the balcony of their house.

In my opinion, this is the same species, but, being grown in a rather sun-less
living room, has not developed fertile fronds.  This plant looks just like
forest-grown P. umbrosa to be found on the net by doing a Google search.

I have placed photos at this address, if you are interested.


I must re-do the top one as it is not very good

Brian Swale.

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