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Re: Killing Platycerium

  • Subject: Re: [ferns] Killing Platycerium
  • From: XericFerns@aol.com
  • Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 02:53:26 EDT

I can't speak specifically to killing/selling Platyceriums, however it seem 
to me that it is the job of the consumer/collector to research the requirements 
of collector plants and to make the decision on whether or not he/she can 
provide the correct environment. 

I also wouldn't expect to be able to make the broad assumption that all 
species within a genera would take the same conditions. In dealing with 
Cheilanthoid ferns, even just in the genus Cheilanthes, I have had to learn by trial and 
error what species take what conditions. California native Cheilanthoids tend 
to be harder to work into my rock garden landscape than do Southwestern 
Cheilanthoids that are accustomed to some summer monsoonal moisture, especially here 
in Bakersfield where we are currently on our way to day five of a projected 
six days of 100+F.

Even though the bulk of my material is spore grown, those few plants that I 
purchase to try here are my responsibility to grow on if they reach me in good 
condition initially.
Just my two cents worth.

David Schwartz
Bakersfield, CA
USDA Zone 9b, Sunset Zone 8

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