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RE: Spring fever- blooming...

Ok- let's see how many things are blooming here.
Columbine -4 varieties (can't recall the names)
Roses (blooming like crazy this year!) Even my one year old climbers (Gloire
de Dijon, Sombruiel, etc.)
Pink Jasmine
Flowering dogwood,
Gerbera daisy,
Guara (just starting),
Sticky monkey flower (can't recall its real name- but the hummers just love
Kangaroo paws
Salvias (pineapple, another purple one, and buds on "black & blue")
Bearded iris
Jupiter's beard
Coreopsis- flying saucer
several sedums
French lavender
A few stragglers- daffodils and freesia

Happy to see my peony made it throught he winter, and several ephemerals
made it back this spring too even if they haven't bloomed yet(trillium,
dog-toothed violet, jack-in-the-pulpit).

Oh- and my pot of red orchid cactus on the back porch is blooming!  I've had
the plant for years- and it finally decided to bloom.  I left it out all
winter this year- so I'm assuming that did the trick.  It has 16 bud, and 3
fully open flowers.  I also learned that unlike the night-blooming cereus I
have- this orchid cactus' flowers stay for days (so far 5 days)!  I'll try
to get a picture and post for you all.

Today was damp, chilly (60) and rainy off and on- so took care of inside
stuff (you know, the usual laundry, house cleaning, cutting and gluing the
transition pieces to the laminate flooring we installed in fall....)

Sac, CA
zone 8-9

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net]On
Behalf Of Chris@widom-assoc.com
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2004 6:14 PM
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Subject: RE: [CHAT] Spring fever


You have Pulmonarias and Epimediums blooming? Columbine already?!!!
Even my anemones aren't blooming yet!  My lamb's ears (Stachys lanata)
look pretty beat up still!  I spent my first day in the garden doing
spring clean-up today.  The hostas are just barely showing,  Most
daylilies are up 4" - 6".  I see that some of my favorites are over
running parts of the garden (i.e.: Rudbeckia laciniata and LYSIMACHIA
CILATA PURPUREA),  If only I had more time, this would be the absolutely
perfect time to divide the hostas, grasses and other perennials as they
are just starting to come up!

All this talk about plant sales has got me thinking about buying a table
at my chorale's flea market and selling plants!  I think that I could
make some money to use towards spring purchases!  And, I would feel good
finding homes for all of my divisions!  I think printing photos and
labels with plant info would be a must and I don't know if I'd have time
to get everything ready.

Long Island, NY
Zone 7

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On
Behalf Of Aplfgcnys@aol.com
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2004 7:57 PM
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Subject: [CHAT] Spring fever

Why, oh why did I think last fall that it would be a good idea to have a

spring horticulture show in the middle of April?  And why did the good
members of
my club agree to this folly?  Of course we didn't expect an extra cold
winter and late spring, but we're all experienced growers and showers
and should
have known better.  Oh well, at least there will be a small show
even though spring has barely begun to show its face.  In fact, I think
we are
missing it altogether - going right straight into summer.  It was in the
70s today after a cold, rain week in the 40s with threats of frost.

Anyway, I have spent the past two days trying to organize some
to enter in this show.  I have lots of daffodils - they are fairly
today - but of course can't identify them.  I have spent hours with
catalogs and
past order lists trying to make sure they are correctly named.  I have
tulip - one of the Kaufmanias.  I know it was a named variety when I
planted it,
but it doesn't look like anything in the catalogs.

Our club is only twelve members, with an average age of about 70.  One
broke a hip a couple of weeks ago.  Two others are not in good health,
one of the younger members has a speaking engagement.  However, I expect
will be some sort of show.  I will have the following entries: Section I
- Bulbs, Corms, Tubers Class 1 - Tulipa Kaufmania Class 2 - Narcissus -
       a. Trumpet  -'Spellbinder'
       b. Trumpet - Miniature - 'Little Gem' ; 'Topolino'
       c. Large Cup - 'Ice Follies'; 'Sweet Harmony'; 'Ipi Tombi'
       d. Multiple blooms - 'Tete-a-Tete'
       e. Double - Constitution Island heirloom
        f. Cyclamineus - 'Jenny' ;'Jack Snipe'; 'Peeping Tom' ; 'Itzim''
       g. Jonquilla - can't find the name but it's a beautiful bloom
       h. Split Corolla - 'Split'
Class 3 - Any other bulbous flower
       a. Scilla siberica 'Spring Beauty'
       b.Anemone blanda - 'Blue Star'; 'Pink Star'
       c. Iphieon uniflorum
Section II - Perennials
Class 4 - Flat, round or sculptural forms
       a. Viola cucculiata (Marsh blue violet), Viola tricolor (Johnny
                Viola papilionacea (Common blue violet)
       b. Helleborus abchasicus
Class 6 - Spray forms.
       a. Pulmonaria 'Mrs. Moon'; 'Coral Springs'
       b. Epimedium roseum; E. sulphureum
       c. Aquilegia canadensis
Class 7 - Grown for beauty of foliage
       a. Stachys lanata (lamb's ears)
       b. Alchemilla mollis (Lady's mantle)
Section III - Branches
Class 8 - Deciduous Shrub
       Chaenomeles speciosa (flowering quince)
       I have a lovely branch of curly willow, but cannot find a
name for it.
Class 9 - Broadleaf evergreen
       Leucothoe Fontanesonia
       Pieris japonica.

I decided at this point not to enter any of the container-grown classes.
member is an orchid specialist, so I know he will fill up that section.
also have good growers of Saintpaulias and cacti, among other things.  I

realize that I will be competing with myself in a number of classes,
unless there
are enough more entries to subdivide further - which could happen.  But
at least
there will be something to  look at.  But crazy - that's me. Auralie

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