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Re: Ah, spring...


I'm sorry that she was rude. I never try to "correct" anyone - and who's to say what's "correct" given regional and common differences? I just use the name I know/consider to be correct if it comes up in conversation. If they pick up on it, fine. If not, either or both of us may be wrong. I remember a few years ago at a plant conference. Adrian Bloom, Allan Armitage and Penelope Hobhouse all had different pronunciations for the same plant.

It happens even with common names. If you don't know the origin, you can screw up. For example, 'Magilla' Perilla. As a takeoff on Magilla Gorilla, the cartoon, it's obvious with the hugely different Perilla leaves. for others it's off the radar. Either way, it's the same plant, and a good one.

And then there's the difference between the northern Pee' oh nee and the southern Pee Oh' nee; Leer' ee ope and Lah Rye' o pee,etc.

Uh. Yup. A couple hundred tomato plants are a problem. I've got my nursery license so can ship to most of you if you want some. With luck, I can sell some at some of the classes I'm teaching in the next few weeks, or on Craig's List or something.

d




----- Original Message ----- From: "Kitty" <kmrsy@comcast.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Saturday, April 14, 2007 6:46 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Ah, spring...


I'm withyou Daryl. It's the plants that matter, not the pronunciation. I recall my first plant sale...my front bed was planted with several huge Astilbes. A woman asked me 'What are those?", Flattered, I replied "AS-til-bees". She said, "You mean uh-STIL-bees". She really killed the mood. If she knew, why'd she ask? Baiting me? I am a stickler on getting the name down correctly when it is for publication as in our MG plant list or an article I might be writing. But not for pronunciation. I don't believe anyone realllllllly knows.

A few HUNDRED tomato plants? Oh, my! That's a disaster. The other plants will hold for rescheduling or another opportunity, but you really can't keep a lot of tomato plants for too long. What will you do?

Kitty
neIN, Zone 5
----- Original Message ----- From: "Daryl" <pulis@mindspring.com>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Saturday, April 14, 2007 4:11 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Ah, spring...


Kitty,

A couple of great folks have educated me on botanical Latin. With regard to pronunciation, one says, emphasize the 3rd syllable from the end and you'll get it right most of the time. The other, (Allan Armitage) concurs, and says that the only people who care are the Brits, and that they think we get it all wrong anyhow. As he says, gardening is supposed to be fun, not painful. I've heard him morph several pronunciations in the 15 years that I've known him. If he changed his pronunciation along the way, does that mean he was wrong at first and has seen the light? I think not.

I had the opportunity to swap plants with a woman yesterday. She had a marvelous garden. Being self-taught, she mangled every plant name, and even the word "deciduous". Did that make her any less a plantswoman? I think not.

Being self-taught, she had a number of plants that are extremely difficult to grow here. She'd planted them because she didn't know they were supposed to be "hard". Hers were thriving.

She was able to point out subtle differences between cultivars - not just growth habit, leaf and flower size and shape, but hardiness, response to micro-climates, etc, even if she didn't get their names "correct" according to "the books".

As long as I know an Acer is an Acer, and I can email my friends around the world about my latest plant lust, I don't give a rip. And when I speak to them in person, if sometimes we have to resort to pen and paper because our "correct" botanical Latin makes no sense in their language, it's less a concern than that if I write "alba" or "lutea" they know that I'm referring to a color.

Sorry about your snow. You'd think winter would be ready to give up by now. We're anticipating strong storms, possible hail an twirlies. I hope the weather guys are wrong. Our MG plant sale was cancelled by the city ( which controls the fairgrounds, where the giant yard sale/MG plant sale is held) because it was supposed to storm all day. Of course, it hasn't started yet and I have a few hundred tomato plants to dispose of. And dogwoods, Iris, Hosta, etc. :-(

d



----- Original Message ----- From: "Kitty" <kmrsy@comcast.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Saturday, April 14, 2007 5:04 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Ah, spring...


I'm so disgusted w this April. It's snowing now. Almost a white-out for a bit, now, just falling. Not sticking much, but geez. It's cold and I wanna work in the yard. I dug and potted some shrubs last night after work, but I need to do more. My sale is in 2 wks.

I ran over to our MG conference this afternoon for the speaker who was giving a talk on Botanical Latin. She lost me right from the start when she touted Hortus Third as the best resource. But I stuck in there, thinking the rest of the talk would be good, but 40 minutes into it, no, and I left. She's the kind of speaker that make people not want to deal w botanical Latin. Boring, slow-speaking, dry, emphasis on - and a real stickler for - pronunciation. In my opinion, pronunciation is a distant second to the value of the words, and she didn't get around to that much at all. IMO, if you say AY-sir and someone else says AH-ker, so what? You both still know you're talking maples. This is botanical Latin, not conversational Latin and they don't necessarily follow the same rules. There's lots of Greek, Russian, and what-have-you involved in plant names. A talk on this subject should strive to make it FUN or your audience will reptans toward the door.

Oh, maybe I'm just in a bad mood.


Kitty
neIN, Zone 5

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