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Re: Re: River Birch


What a shame!!!  Is there anything that can stop/deter/reduce this borer. 
I'm understanding from other things that I am reading that the continuing
warming will make it worse.  We always have had the pine borer in the South
but cooler winters usually kept the numbers small.  Not having a "normal"
winter in almost twenty years has resulted in unusually large insect
populations that are very difficult to keep under control.


> [Original Message]
> From: <Cersgarden@aol.com>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Date: 8/9/2006 2:28:53 PM
> Subject: Re: [CHAT] Re: River Birch
>
> In a message dated 8/9/06 12:13:34 PM, holmesbm@usit.net writes:
>
>
> > The new hybrid of paper birch that was mentioned in my workshop was
> > "Heritage"
> > 
>
> Bonnie, this is the better   one for our area also but not on the
recommended 
> list. Due to our heavy clay, birches have a iron chlorosis   problem
here.   
> I have a huge 3 trunked birch, not Heritage just a species & it is
beautiful 
> but certainly one of the messiest trees you can have.   My neighbor has 3
in 
> their landscape that suffer and look terrible.   They finally removed the
worst 
> one.   I love the bark!
>      The information I rcd yesterday is the Emerald Ash Borer has killed
> 15 
> million ash trees in Michigan.   Pockets of damaging activity have also
been 
> found in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio & Windsor Ontario.   In 2005 visual
surveys 
> were conducted in all 99 counties in Iowa. More than 1300 ash trees in
238 
> sites were observed for the signs & sysmptoms of EAB.   Several instances
of 
> native boring insects were recorded but NO EAB were found.
>      Ceres
>
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