hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Missing in cyberspace--again!


Jim:  Yes, I really believe you...I do, honestly.  
I think that many men are raised with a much 
healthier sense of disregard for their own 
personal idiosyncratic features (or lack thereof)...
with the possible exception of men so 
gorgeous they make women salivate but then
 often they are too vain to be useful for anything 
but modeling careers, acting, or pool/cabana
 boys  LOL!!!  My husband has a hard time
 understanding how so much in society conditions
 women to think bad things about their bodies 
in a way that men are often spared...and 
tragically, it starts at a very early age for most 
girls...think about when little girls are usually 
given their first Barbie doll or paper dolls with
 pretty clothes to wear.  Even in the most
 innocuous of fairy tales, the female must be
 delicate, petite, and above all beautiful (these
 days they at least throw in resourceful, 
independent, and intelligent) but the hero,
 well he can often be a less than perfect 
specimen (i.e. Consider Cyrano DeBergerac,
 Beauty and the Beast and Disney's Hunchback
 of Notre Dame)  Men are encouraged from a
 very early age to look inside themselves for the 
signs of character and traditionally women 
were in many ways encouraged to find their 
character in their faces, their bodies, their ability
 to attract and retain an attractive, intelligent, 
successful mate...Centuries of conditioning
are difficult to eradicate but women everywhere 
today I believe are tired of buying into that system
 and hopefully mothers and fathers everywhere will teach both their daughters and their sons to look inside first, 
foremost, and last when defining who they are as
people.  I know I may have come off as a bit flippant
 earlier (o.k. probably alot!) but obviously this is a 
subject dear to my heart...as both the mother of two
 daughters and a son and as a nurse who has had 
the distinct unpleasure of caring for women who 
abused themselves to the point of starvation, 
heart failure by the age of 30, and many times...
death all in a quest to define themselves by 
measure of a perfect body.

So yes, Jim--I really do believe you.  :-)
  
Melody, IA (Z 5/4)

"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious."    
--Albert Einstein

 --- On Fri 12/13, jim singer < jsinger@igc.org > wrote:From: jim singer [mailto: jsinger@igc.org]To: gardenchat@hort.netDate: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 14:52:10 -0500Subject: Re: [CHAT] Missing in cyberspace--again!would you believe me, melody, if i told you i have never, never, ever had the least interest in looking different than i did. i thought i looked cool at 14; i thought i looked cool at 40; and i think i look cool now. that is, i thought i looked cool at every age whenever i thought about how it looked. which was not very often. ever since i was about 60 i've had an asymmetrical nose [basal cell got a big piece of one side]. it catches a lot of peoples attention. and that's way cool, too. i tell them my face was painted on me by modigliani if they ask.

_______________________________________________
Join Excite! - http://www.excite.com
The most personalized portal on the Web!

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT



Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement