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RE: xeric plants for the southwest


I highly recommend High Country Gardens!  Because of our dry summers (just
when the heat is on) I like to put in a number of xeroscopic plants and they
have a good variety.  

Blessings,
Bonnie 

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On Behalf
Of Johnson Cyndi D Civ 95 CG/SCSRT
Sent: Monday, February 06, 2006 4:52 PM
To: 'gardenchat@hort.net'
Subject: RE: [CHAT] xeric plants for the southwest

What kind of plants are you looking for? Flowering, foliage, spiky stuff, or
trees? 
I like these 3 companies for xeric plants - Las Pilitas
(www.laspilitas.com), Yucca Do (www.yuccado.com), and High Country Gardens
(www.highcountrygardens.com).  There's a company called Native American Seed
(www.seedsource.com) which looks more like native Texas seed to me, you
might look at their site.
There are a lot of salvias that insist on practically no water in summer,
tricky if the climate suddenly gets wetter. And I have a number of
penstemons quite happy with only 3 or 4 waterings all summer. Some of my
penstemons, and salvias plus gaillardia, lavenders, santolina, cistus, and
rosemary seem to keep plugging along whether they get regular water or not.
Desert willow (chilopsis) is a nice xeric tree, not quite so deserty looking
as palo verde. I haven't had luck with agastaches yet although I'm going to
keep trying. I hear centranthus is a nice xeric too, although I gather it
spreads like anything if it's happy, so I've not tried it. Speaking of
spreading, perovskia is doing great in my dry garden, I'll be digging out
its offspring in a month or so. Junipers make evergreen shrubs and adapt to
drought pretty well. 

Cyndi 


-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On Behalf
Of Theresa
Sent: Monday, February 06, 2006 10:57 AM
To: GardenChat
Subject: [CHAT] xeric plants for the southwest

Hi all-

I'm in the process of birthday shopping for my mom and would like some
recommendations from the dry/hot climate members of this group.  What have
you had success growing (and keeping alive) through drought conditions?  My
mom is in Austin TX and they've had very little water (and she can't seem to
adapt to changing her watering patterns).  Soooo- trying to find something
garden-tested that might survive.
Theresa

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