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Re: terms


Melody, I don't have any books here with me to verify, but I'm fairly sure
that Hollyhock, Alcea rosea is not rhizomatous.
Kitty

On Thu,  9 Jan 2003 07:13:57 -0500 (EST) Melody <mhobertm@excite.com> wrote:

>  But from a rhizome?
> 
> 
> Melody, IA (Z 5/4)
> 
> "The most beautiful thing we can experience is
> the mysterious."    
> --Albert Einstein --- On Thu 01/09, Pamela J.
> Evans wrote:From: Pamela
> J. Evans [mailto: gardenqueen@gbronline.com]To:
> gardenchat@hort.netDate:
> Thu, 9 Jan 2003 06:01:36 -0600Subject: Re:
> [CHAT] termsHollyhocks are
> self-seeding biennials. Mine do exactly the
> same thing, even the ones in
> pots! ---------- Original Message
> ----------------------------------From:
> "Melody" Reply-To:
> gardenchat@hort.netDate: Thu, 9 Jan 2003
> 05:20:51 -0500 (EST)>So what do
> they call perennials that only produce foliage
> and blooms>every other
> year? A few years back, I was astounded to find
> a huge>rhizome of what
> turned out to be a hollyhock buried in my back
> yard>underneath grass
> that had been being mowed for years on end...I
> dug it>up and
> transplanted it to my garden...it was easily
> well over a foot>long and
> several inches thick. Now, safe from being
> mowed down, it lives>on but
> it only comes up every other year, blooms like
> mad and seeds>itself
> every where but the next year it is no where to
> be seen...Is this>thing
> just a freak of nature or do other plants have
> a growth pattern>similar
> to this?>>>>Melody, IA (

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