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Re: Hello/now vegetables

Melody, I do understand what you are saying.  For me it worked in the 
opposite way.  The grandmother who raised me had lots of odd food tastes and 
used me as an excuse for not serving things.  She would say "we can't have 
onions, the baby (that was me) doesn't like them."  I don't know what she did 
before I came along - maybe she had used my mother the same way.  Anyway, 
when I first got to college I had to learn to eat lots of things or starve, 
and surprisingly I found that I liked most of the things I had been taught 
not to like.  It was partly rebellion - I would like them just because I 
wasn't supposed to.  When my children came along I tried to give them the 
opportunity to experience many things.   I didn't insist that they clean 
their plates, just that they must taste a food before they decided they 
didn't like it.  Often they would say "Oh, I didn't know it tasted like 
that."  One son has never knowingly eaten a whole banana (he once ate and 
enjoyed banana bread until he found out what it was), but the other two have 
pretty eclectic tastes.  
  We'll have to think of pleasant associations you can make with vegetables.  
Many of them are really beautiful - or maybe we can get you to think about 
them in a sexy way...           Auralie

In a message dated 03/17/2003 4:40:04 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
mhobertm@excite.com writes:

> Auralie: I think much of my distaste of veggies is more of an
> experiential thing...a defiance of my father's willful cruelty...there
> weren't many things I could control in my life as a kid but what I put
> into my mouth certainly was one of them...As an adult, I know this is an
> insane reason to not like veggies and I do still upon occasion relent
> and try something I am sure I have always hated. You'd be happy to know
> that my son has quite convinced my of how yummy fresh spinach is and now
> I eat it all the time! I think as time goes by and I can learn to
> associate certain foods with more pleasant experiences, I will probably
> learn to like them better. For many people, food isn't just about
> food...it's about emotions, and unfortunately learning to disconnect
> those associations is easier said than done. :-)

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