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Re: Guess everyone is recovering

Yoga also helps...there are wonderful stretch exercises and positions that
help the back and help to tighten the stomach muscles for support...just
make sure you don't go to a "power yoga" class.
Bonnie Zone 7 ETN

> [Original Message]
> From: Marge Talt <mtalt@hort.net>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Date: 11/29/2005 4:09:49 AM
> Subject: Re: [CHAT] Guess everyone is recovering
> What a bummer, Andrea - been there; done that.  I go to my beloved
> chiropractor every 2 weeks; he keeps me from becoming a pretzel,
> which I would if I did not go.  Been going for 23 years now.  Before
> I started going to him, I was flat on my back in agony for weeks with
> boring regularity.
> There are exercises you can do once you recover - but you really need
> a chiropractor to develop the right ones for your particular problem
> and you have to start off easy - just a few at a time and work up to
> whatever amount is recommended.  Often back pulls are the result of
> poor stomach muscles - the back takes all the brunt of whatever you
> do if your stomach muscles are weak.
> You need to be very careful how you move; I am now super conscious of
> what I'm doing; did not used to be - I once pulled my back majorly
> just lifting a cat off the floor.  Lifting, in particular, is tricky
> - you have to learn to use your legs, not your back.  Being tired or
> stressed out can make the slightest off movement turn into major back
> trauma.   Tension will twist you up in no time.....and given that
> you've just moved...that's major stress time, I expect you're
> particularly vulnerable to back problems if you're subject to them. 
> My back quack and I agree that if I could just play in the garden all
> the time instead of living the 'fun' life I do, I probably wouldn't
> have to go get treatments very often...
> Moist heat helps.  Use a heating pad with a damp washcloth on it
> (washcloth next to skin, of course); lie on your stomach with a
> pillow under your hips - 2 rolled up pillows at your face help keep
> you breathing and keep your head straight down:-)  Use the moist heat
> for no more than 20 minutes at a stretch. If you can manage to do
> this every hour - which is a royal pain - it really, really helps
> things heal faster.  
> Wishing you a very speedy recovery.
> Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
> mtalt@hort.net
> Shadyside Garden Designs
> > Pam, I usually recognize those 'twinges' too, but this truly
> blindsided
> > me. I really don't know what in the world did it, except maybe a
> variety
> > of things. The Dr said this was from twisting, not bending. So, who
> > knows? Still VERY sore today, and the worst thing is to sit, so I
> spend
> > a lot of time walking around my tiny house thinking how dirty it
> is.
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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