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RE: Jam


Ah.  That is much different from the Concord Grapes we used.  Dad's old time
methods of "farming" created large healthy fruits, but the skins were thin
in comparison to what you describe.   Being a Northern girl, I wasn't aware
there were that many differences between "grapes."  Thanks for the
education, Jim!

Bonnie (SW OH - zone 5)

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On Behalf
Of james singer
Sent: Tuesday, September 05, 2006 5:53 PM
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Jam

Don't know if you're familiar with muscadine grapes, Bonny, but they are big
berries [size of a jawbreaker], borne individually on the vine, not in
bunches. While their flavor is reminiscent of northern slip-skin grapes,
their hide is firmly attached--virtually impossible to peel. 
The skin is also adheres to the pulp and is tough--like the upper leather in
an pair of expensive Italian shoes. The easiest, and quickest, way to deal
with them is to seed them then puree them in the food processor.

On Sep 5, 2006, at 5:09 PM, Bonnie & Bill Morgan wrote:

> Mom never seeded her grapes first.  After she cooked them, she ran 
> them through a cone shape colander with a wooden paddle of sorts and 
> pushed the pulp through san seeds.  Making jelly is a fun family 
> activity too.
>
> Bonnie (SW OH - zone 5)
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On 
> Behalf Of james singer
> Sent: Tuesday, September 05, 2006 2:40 PM
> To: Garden Chat
> Subject: [CHAT] Jam
>
> Besides hunting down a car this weekend, we made a batch of grape jam 
> with a gallon of muscadine grapes we rescued from a road-side vendor.
> It turned out surprisingly good. The only tedious part was seeding the 
> grapes, but even that wasn't too bad. This adventure has inspired Ms 
> Fatma to want to try making beautyberry jelly. Anyone ever done that?
> I've got a couple of recipes from the Florida native plant society 
> that look interesting but definitely labor intensive.
>
>
> Island Jim
> Southwest Florida
> 27.0 N, 82.4 W
> Hardiness Zone 10
> Heat Zone 10
> Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
> Maximum 100 F [38 C]
>
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>
Island Jim
Southwest Florida
27.0 N, 82.4 W
Hardiness Zone 10
Heat Zone 10
Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
Maximum 100 F [38 C]

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