hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
Gallery of Plants
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Mailing Lists
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Sports...several definitions

Sports Scholars,

We run across definitions from time to time. Some seem incorrect because
of a word insertion or for some other reason. What have you found that
appears different?

1 A definition from American College Dictionary..a part of a plant that
shows an unusual deviation from the parent type ( plant) . I wonder if
an  "usual" deviation therefore is NOT a sport?.

2. In one post I called a bud sport " a change in the appearance in the
part of the plant that sprouted from a bud." I referred to it as a
gardeners term but it is more than that. It is also used as a scientific
term by Botanists, Horticulturists, Plant Anatomists but not by
Geneticists strangely. I wonder what they have against the term?.

3 In an email from Holland on August 16, 1999 a definition is given as a
shoot differing from the mother plant irrespective of the cause. Now we
can think of several causes of shoots  that may  differ from the mother
plant, such as virus, damage of all sorts, differences due to cultural
factors , etc. So this definition has some weaknesses.

4. Hartmann ( of Kester and Hartman...the plant propagation authorities,
i.e. Plant Propagatin, Principles and Practices) in an early edition
describes a sport as a plant arising from a bud which is suddenly
affected by a change in the inheritable character that can be
perpetuated by asexual means. A little wordy but who dares to argue with
the experts who write textbooks for college use?

5. In a later edition Hartmann and Kester describes it as a branch which
shows changes in one or more inheritable characters that can be
perpetuated by asexual means. Are you thinking what I am thinking? Yes,
a division is a branch, so this definition is certainly accurate for

What is your definition for a sport...technically, it is called  a "bud

Jim H.

To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@mallorn.com with the

 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index