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Questions from the Past


Dear Friends,

Just in case you aren't already feeling old, the following will have you 
calling for your Geritol and wheelchair!  (Outta my way, sonny!!!!)

Jim
 
 Subject: Some Questions from the past
 
 
 > This is a little exercise for your memory... no cheating... This is a
 > "remember back then" game. Answer each one...answers at the
 > bottom.....Don't cheat now. And, have fun!!
 >               ********************************
 > 1."Kookie; Kookie.
 > Lend me your ________________."
 >=20
 > 2. The "battle cry" of the hippies in the sixties was "Turn on; tune
 > in;________________."
 >=20
 > 3. After the Lone Ranger saved the day and rode off into the
 > sunset, the grateful citizens would ask, "Who was that masked
 > man?" Invariably, someone would answer, "I don't know, but
 > he left this behind." What did he leave behind_____________?
 >=20
 > 4. Folk songs were played side by side with rock and roll. One
 > of the most memorable folk songs included these lyrics: "When
 > the rooster crows at the break of dawn, look out your window
 > and I'll be gone. You're the reason I'm travelling on ________-."
 >=20
 > 5. A group of protesters arrested at the Democratic convention
 > in Chicago in 1968 achieved cult status, and were known as
 > the________________.
 >=20
 > 6. When the Beatles first came to the U.S. in early 1964, we all
 > watched them on the ____________Show.
 >=20
 > 7. Some of us who protested the Vietnam war did so by burning
 > our________________.
 >=20
 > 8. We all learned to read using the same books. We read about
 > the thrilling lives and adventures of Dick and Jane.  What was
 > the name of Dick and Jane's dog?______
 >=20
 > 9. The cute, little car with the engine in the back and the trunk
 > (what there was of it) in the front, was called the VW.  What
 > other name(s) did it go by? ___________&___________
 >=20
 > 10. A Broadway musical and movie gave us the gang names the
 > ___________and the ________________.
 >=20
 > 11. In the seventies, we called the drop-out nonconformists
 > "hippies."  But in the early sixties, they were know as ________.
 >=20
 > 12. William Bendix played Chester A. Riley, who always seemed
 > to get the short end of the stick in the tele- vision program, "The
 > Life of Riley." At the end of each show, poor Chester would turn
 > to the camera and exclaim, "What a ________________."
 >=20
 > 13. "Get your kicks, ________________."
 >=20
 > 14. "The story you are about to see is true. The names have been
 > changed ______________."
 >=20
 > 15. The real James Bond, Sean Connery, mixed his martinis a
 > special way. _______________.
 >=20
 > 16. "In the jungle, the mighty jungle, ________________."
 >=20
 > 17. That "adult" book by Henry Miller - the one that contained
 > all the "dirty" dialogue - was called _________.
 >=20
 > 18. Today, the math geniuses in school might walk around with
 > a calculator strapped to their belt.  But back in the sixties, members
 > of the math club used a _____________.
 >=20
 > 19. In 1971, singer Don Maclean sang a song about "the day the
 > music died."  This was a reference and tribute to ____________.
 >=20
 > 20. A well-known television commercial featured a driver who
 > was miraculously lifted through thin air and into the front seat of
 > a convertible. The matching slogan was "Let Hertz ___________."
 >=20
 > 21. After the twist, the mashed potatoes, and the watusi, we
 > "danced" under a stick that was lowered as low as we could go
 > in a dance called the ______________.
 >=20
 > 22. "N-E-S-T-L-E-S; Nestles makes the very best... _________."
 >=20
 > 23. In the late sixties, the "full figure" style of Jane Russell and
 > Marilyn Monroe gave way to the "trim" look, as first exemplified
 > by British model _______________.
 >=20
 > 24. Sachmo was America's "ambassador of goodwill." Our parents
 > shared this great jazz  trumpet player with us.  His name was
 > ________________.
 >=20
 > 25. On Jackie Gleason's variety show in the sixties, one of the
 > most popular segments was Joe, the Bartender."  Joe's regular
 > visitor at the bar was that slightly off - center, but lovable
 > character,_____________. (The character's name, not the
 > actor's.)
 >=20
 > 26. We can remember the first satellite placed into orbit. The
 > Russians did it; it was called _______________.
 >=20
 > 27. What takes a licking and keeps on ticking?____________.
 >=20
 > 28. One of the big fads of the late fifties and sixties was a large
 >  plastic ring that we twirled around our waist; it was called the
 > ________________.
 >=20
 > 29. The "Age of Aquarius" was brought into the mainstream in
 > the Broadway musical ________________.
 >=20
 > 30. This is a two-parter: Red Skelton's hobo character (not the
 > hayseed; the hobo) was ________________.  Red ended his
 > television show by saying, "Good night, and _____________."
 >=20
 >           =
 =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
 =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
 > THE ANSWERS:
 > 1. "Kookie; Kookie; lend me your comb." If you said "ears,"
 > you're in the wrong millennium, pal; you've spent way too much
 > time in Latin class.
 > 2. The "battle cry" of the hippies in the sixties was "Turn on;
 > tune in; drop out."  Many people who proclaimed that 30 years
 > ago today are Wall Sreet bond traders and corporate lawyers.
 > 3. The Lone Ranger left behind a silver bullet. Several of you
 > said he left behind his mask.  Oh, no; even off the screen, Clayton
 > Moore would not be seen as the Lone Ranger without his mask!
 > 4. "When the rooster crows at the break of dawn, look out your
 > window and I'll be gone. You're the reason I'm travelling on:
 > Don't think twice, it's all right."
 > 5. The group of protesters arrested at the Democratic convention
 > in Chicago in 1968 were known as the Chicago seven. As Paul
 > Harvey says, "They would like me to mention their names."
 > 6. When the Beatles first came to the U.S. in early 1964, we all
 > watched them on the Ed Sullivan Show.
 > 7. Some of us who protested the Vietnam war did so by burning
 > our draft cards. If you said "bras," you've got the right spirit, but
 > nobody ever burned a bra while I was watching. The "bra burning"
 > days came as a by-product of women's liveration move-ment
 > which had nothing directly to do with the Viet Nam war.
 > 8. Dick and Jane's dog was Spot. "See Spot run." Whatever
 > happened to them?  Rumor has it they have been replaced in
 > some school systems by "Heather Has Two Mommies."
 > 9. It was the VW Beetle, or more affectionately, the Bug.
 > 10. A Broadway musical and movie gave us the gang names the
 > Sharks and the Jets.  West Side Story.
 > 11. In the early sixties, the drop-out, non-conformists were known
 > as beatniks. Maynard G. Krebs was the classic beatnik, except
 > that he had no rhythm, man; a beard, but no beat.
 > 12. At the end of "The Life of Riley," Chester would turn to the
 > camera and exclaim, "What a revolting development this is."
 > 13. "Get your kicks, on Route 66."
 > 14. "The story you are about to see is true. The names have been
 > changed to protect the innocent."
 > 15. The real James Bond, Sean Connery, mixed his martinis a
 > special way: shaken, not stirred.
 > 16. "In the jungle, the mighty jungle, the lion sleeps tonight."
 > 17. That "adult" book by Henry Miller was called Tropic of
 > Cancer. Today, it would hardly rate a PG-13 rating.
 > 18. Back in the sixties, members of the math club used a slide
 > rule.
 > 19. "The day the music died" was a reference and tribute to
 > Buddy Holly.
 > 20. The matching slogan was "Let Hertz put you in the driver's
 > seat."
 > 21. After the twist, the mashed potatoes, and the watusi, we
 > "danced" under a stick in a dance called the Limbo.
 > 22. "N-E-S-T-L-E-S; Nestles makes the very
 > best...........chooo-c'late."  In the television commercial, =
 "chocolate"
 >=20
 > was sung by a puppet - a dog. (Remember his mouth flopping
 > open and shut?)
 > 23. In the late sixties, the "full figure" style gave way to the
 > "trim" look, as first exemplified by British model Twiggy.
 > 24. Our parents shared this great jazz trumpet player with us.
 > His name was Louis Armstrong
 > 25. Joe's regular visitor at the bar was Crazy Googenhiem.
 > 26. The Russians put the first satellite into orbit; it was called
 > Sputnik.
 > 27. What takes a licking and keeps on ticking? A Timex watch.
 > 28. The large plastic ring that we twirled around our waist was
 > called the hula-hoop.
 > 29. The "Age of Aquarius" was brought into the mainstream in the
 > Broadway musical "Hair".
 > 30. Red Skelton's hobo character was Freddie the Freeloader.
 > (Clem Kaddiddlehopper was the "hay seed.") Red ended his television
 > show by saying, "Good night, and may God bless."

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