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Re: Rhododrendron and Hostas as Companions

In a message dated 1/14/1999 3:05:18 PM Central Standard Time,
sussextreeinc@ce.net writes:

 Input is welcome from gardeners with practical gardening experiences and
 from scientist with purely scientific viewpoints. Or someone with both.

As you mentioned, the native soil in my garden is heavy clay. I have amended
the soil in most of the garden by incorporating peat moss and shredded oak

During the growing season I fertilize heavily with the foliar Miracid. I also
mulch hostas with fresh oak leaves each spring or fall. 

Several years ago, I put in an island bed and used primarily Pro-Mix. Hostas
do best in that bed.

I grow only one rhodo and find that I have to scratch in Aluminum sulfate
every other year due to yellowing of the leaves. In that area, although I use
miracid on the hostas, most have not done well. (I did not amend the soil.) I
intend to remove those hostas and amend; however, there is one hosta that has
done fantastically well---Edina Heritage---in that area. 
Do you think perhaps that the sieboldiana types do better in alkaline soil
than others?

I have never had the soil here analysed, so I do not know what the pH is---I
would think rather high.   

It would be intersting to get the views of Patsy Stygall, who grows rhodos and
hostas side by side. 
Patsy, come in and tell us.

Clyde Crockett z5 Indianapolis IN
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