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Re: TC and OS


Joanne,

Good question.

I suspect that the term Originator's Stock (OS) means whatever the catalog
writer wants it to mean.  I think generally the term is used to indicate
that the seller obtained the plant directly from, or can trace it directly
to the originator, indicating that there can be no question that the plant
is true to name.  At least that's what I've always assumed it meant.  Never
thought to ask.  I know that the 'Gold Standard' (along with many other
varieties) I sell did not come out of tissue culture, so if we go back far
enough through all the hands my initial plant passed through, it ultimately
came from Pauline Banyai's garden.  I guess I could theoretically call it
OS, but that would sure be a stretch.

The fact that a plant is not noted as (OS) does not mean that it comes from
tissue culture.

Chick

Joanne Pyszczek wrote:

> One of my fellow local hostaphiles always asks when I get a new order
> in if the plants are tissue culture.  While they are obviuosly not first
> year liners I've always assumed unless they
> are marked in the catalog as OS they probably originated from tissue
> culture and have been grown on in pots, or field grown since they are
> usually either large singles or even multiple eye plants.  Is that
> generally true?
> Joanne
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  • References:
    • TC and OS
      • From: Joanne Pyszczek <jopyz@earthlink.net>



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