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Re: P. Attar of Roses - odd

  • Subject: Re: [IGSROBIN] P. Attar of Roses - odd
  • From: maria guzman <mirror@3RIVERS.NET>
  • Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 08:21:35 -0600

Let me quote fromMiniature and Dwarf Geraniums by Harold Bagust:

"...bacterial fasciation [....] is caused by the pathogen Corynebacterium
fascians first described in 1936 by [etc. etc.].  It appears as a cluster
of short, swollen or fleshy stems, almost white in colour and distorted, at
or just below soil level.  An examination of the plant will usually reveaal
several more galls attached to the roots, and these may develop until they
appear above the soil in grotesque growths or clusters.

"The plants are usually unaffected although normal growth may be retarded a
little, and apart from the unsightly appearance the growths do not appear
to have any damaging effect.  None the less it is advisable to break off
any growths as soon as they are discovered and burn them.  The pathogenb is
soil-borne, so infected soil must not be re-used, and it is inadvisable to
use infected plants for propagation."

I've had this appear on a couple of my propagated cuttings. The growths are
not necessarily 'white' but green.  You can pull them off but they will
probably reappear.


>Hi Everyone :)  I have an 'Attar of Roses' plant that is growing a little
>weirdly.  At the base of the main stem there are what seems to be clusters
>of new growth, but they are all in a tight little ball.  I see no evidence
>of bugs, and the plant is healthy in every other way.  I have posted a scan,
>and I think you can tell what I mean, although I had to lay the pot/plant
>down on the scanner.  There are two old leaves at the top of the cluster,
>but the dark areas within the cluster are actually red-ish and not brown or
>dying.  Any help is appreciated, if anyone has seen anything like this
>Thanks - the link is:
>Please excuse the cross post.

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