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Re: HYB: First TB seedling

  • Subject: Re: HYB: First TB seedling
  • From: "Margie Valenzuela" <IrisLady@comcast.net>
  • Date: Sun, 29 Apr 2007 12:27:13 -0700

Griff, I'm always interested in seeing reds.  The falls on this one seem to be rather smooth in color even around the beards ( does it lack half marks?). Would you mind sharing who the parents are?
 
~ Margie V.
Oro Valley, AZ.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2007 11:00 AM
Subject: [iris-photos] HYB: First TB seedling

Friends  --  Please excuse the ads accompanying this posting.  I had to download Adobe Reader 8 in order to import some forms, and it's trying to take over a bunch of my programs.  It hijacked this morning's photos into Adobe Photo Album, and I haven't ýet found a way to liberate them, so am sending this one as is.
 
That said, this is 05E1, the second TB to bloom here and the first TB seedling to bloom.   It is stunted, an obvious victim of the weather, and nothing special in any case, but its fragrance is wonderful!  A chocolate-orange scent.  So, it will survive to bloom again.
 
Even though my gardens were spared the dreadful damage suffered by so many of you, I am seeing the delayed results of the roller coaster weather of January-to-April in several ways.  Almost all the flowers are taller than usual.  Some are well-proportioned, but I'm seeing a worrisome number of TB stalks with no or little branching.  Also, some IBs twice their normal height and the flower heads bent over.  The IBs and TBs are due to explode during convention week, so I think I'll find a lot of flowers needing staking when I got back.  --  Griff
 
Zone 7 along the tidal Potomac near Mount Vernon, in Virginia

The sender has included tags, so you can do more with these photos. Download Photoshop (R) Album Starter Edition-Free!
http://www.adobe.com/aboutstarteredition

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