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Re: photo backgrounds, etc
iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
  • Subject: Re: photo backgrounds, etc
  • From: "d7432da" <donald@eastland.net>
  • Date: Mon, 08 Feb 2010 00:11:39 -0000

 


That's why I phrased the question referencing the monitor. Here is a representation of 6 photos of the same bloom. On my monitor, three appear true blue and one more tilting mostly blue. There are two showing that are more lavender than blue. The one Mike selected and the one from Superstition. Differences in monitors aside, the way this is presented is as one photo of all six. The differences in the way the blooms appear should be apparent on any monitor because they have been placed into a single photo via Mike's method of putting six on one page and then posting that page as a single photo. How does the one he selected compare to the others on your monitor. Is it more lavender than others, more blue, or how does it fit?

Donald Eaves
donald@eastland.net
Texas Zone 7b, USA

--- In iris-photos@yahoogroups.com, Autmirislvr@... wrote:
>
> My understanding has been that all monitors are different. How can any of us know what someone else is seeing on their monitor? Is the middle right one really the same on both monitors? How could you tell?
>
> <<Which one is closest to what you see per viewing on your monitor?>>
>
>
> Betty W.
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mike Greenfield <mgreenfield@...>
> To: iris-photos <iris-photos@yahoogroups.com>
> Sent: Sun, Feb 7, 2010 1:19 pm
> Subject: [iris-photos] Re: photo backgrounds, etc
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> How small did you make the individual pics to put on one page??
> jim in AZ
>
>
>
> I opened a new blank image in Paint Shop Pro 12" X 12". Each iris photo was resized to 8". Then pasted as a new layer in the blank image. Then stretched to fit. Same can be done in Adobe Elements.
>
> I'm not sure what you mean by "photocopying".
> Donald Eaves.
>
> Sorry I meant to say photoshoping = adjusting photo with software. Spell check changed it and I didn't catch it.
>
> The whole discussion, though, does raise an interesting point in a similar area. What about the 'official' R&I descriptions? How much leeway are they given? Since blooms are not static, where is the point at which describing it is pinpointed? The 2nd day? Somewhere in the middle of opening and dying? Obviously it's neither practical or possible to provide the progression of the life of the bloom, so how do folks decide?
> Donald Eaves.
>
> Good question! First write discripions of 5 iris you grow. This gives you an idea of the problem. Then give us a fix. The description is up to the hybredizer. The registrar does not change it. It is just a basic thing. If it fits it grow one from a reputable grower.
>
> That's interesting! Which one is closest to what you see per viewing on your monitor?
> Donald Eaves.
>
> The middle one on the right.
>
>
> Mike Greenfield
> Zone 5b
> SW Ohio
> http://www.home.roadrunner.com/~irisinohio/
>



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