hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
Gallery of Plants
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Mailing Lists
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Re: Re: HYB: striped standard MTB seedling

  • Subject: Re: Re: Re: HYB: striped standard MTB seedling
  • From: "Ann Conway" <amconway@telusplanet.net>
  • Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2009 12:51:20 -0600

That's all new information to me! VERY interesting! It also explains a few things. ;)
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 12:34 PM
Subject: [iris-photos] Re: Re: HYB: striped standard MTB seedling

Ann wrote:
I find this very interesting. What can make these incompatabilities happen, othere than chromosome count?

I don't know for sure, but I've always sort of assumed that it must have something to do with the relatively strong self-incompatibility of most beardeds. I haven't checked this but that's what I've been told anyweay. I don't know if it's the right system for bearded irises, but I've read that in some other plants, the pollen won't grow down the styles if it has an incompatibility gene that matches one of the incompatibility genes that the pod parent has. The plants own pollen would always have a match and so would always be not-compatible. Offspring would have at least half of their pollen matching (and so those pollen grains would be incompatible), sometimes all would be incompatible. This system helps ensure that outbreeding to unrelated irises will occur.
Another thing I've noticed is that I can cross certain species only in one direction. For example, I was able to cross Iris pallida 'Kupari' with Iris variegata only by using the pallida as the seed parent. Why it is this way, I don't have a clue but I know that it also happens in other plants. It's referred to as "unilateral compatibility" if you want to try to find out more.
So, I try to just remember these difficulties and plan my crosses accordingly. But as soon as you think you've got something figured out, be prepared for more surprises! ;0)

Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index

 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement