hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: IRIS DEVELOPMENT: WHY DONT WE USE OTHER PLANT POLLEN FOR RARE NEW IRISES?

  • Subject: Re: [iris-photos] IRIS DEVELOPMENT: WHY DONT WE USE OTHER PLANT POLLEN FOR RARE NEW IRISES?
  • From: "jjbhphd" JBHPHD@BELLSOUTH.NET
  • Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 00:56:07 -0500

Friends,
 
 
While I would never want to say that it is impossible, at least in nature as we know it, it seems impossible for two living critters from two different genuses to have off spring.  There are some species of iris within the genus that seem to be unable to swap genetic material. Iris cannot mate with lillies, and the exceptional cross over or boundary case may be the belamcanda lily of I. dicotoma.
 
It is just the same in the animal world: a male horse charmed by a female donkey may produce a henny and the reverse would give us a mule, but both of these cross species animals appear to be infertile.  We know of no instance in which a horse has impregnated a cow.
 
Pollen, semen, it is analogicalloy the same.  It is the male fertility key, but it does not fit into all locks.
 
Possibly I have not said this in the most faciolitous way, and I may not have all the technical jargon of  a very proper, modern, up to date biologist, for the last formal biology course I had was in high school. 
 
Unclarity about issues like this are reason why teaching of intelligent design in public schools is a daster equivalent to shooting ourselves in the foot.  There is a huge body of empirically established information that is not really open to debate,  even though the very frontiers of science are open to debate.
 
But who knows.  Maybe there is a chromosomal match between some iris and some pine trees. If so,  we would expect to see at least some of the iris develop needles and grow very, very tall.
 
James Harrison
Asheville
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 7:54 PM
Subject: Re: [iris-photos] IRIS DEVELOPMENT: WHY DONT WE USE OTHER PLANT POLLEN FOR RARE NEW IRISES?

It was not my iris Gerry but someone elses who indicated it was the Pine pollen that , got into the iris. I am novice and do not know about such things.  To those Iris experienced developres Is mixing different pollen with irises possible  as was suspected by the one iris developer who contributed "strange Brew"?
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 8:21 AM
Subject: Re: [iris-photos] IRIS DEVELOPMENT: WHY DONT WE USE OTHER PLANT POLLEN FOR RARE NEW IRISES?

KEITH MINEO wrote:
> *reference:  Strange Brew:*
> **
> *This is surely one of the most interesting irises where, of all
> things, " Pine tree pollen" had fallen on the iris causing this
> beautiful color combinations. Please do try to replicate this. Another
> idea, If Pine Tree Pollen was responsible for this "rare" iris
> genetics, why don't we try  to use other plant pollen as well and
> experiment.  Please give me your thoughts...keith*

My thoughts? That the probability of pine pollen having anything to do
with the genetics of your beautiful iris is so small I could not compute it.

Gerry


No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.392 / Virus Database: 268.5.6/336 - Release Date: 5/10/2006


SPONSORED LINKS
Silk plant Plant maintenance Plant safety
Plant relocation Plant grow light Exchange


YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS






Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement