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Re: A. splendium (sensu lato)


In a message dated 4/2/00 9:59:57 AM Central Daylight Time, SelbyHort@aol.com
writes:

<< The plants I saw at Fairchild had short
 internodes, bullate leaves, matte surface. I think these may be different
 species than the plant Dewey has. >>
I thought maybe we were done with this, but alas, one more try.
    1. Dewey has the same thing as Fairchild because his came from there.
    2. Dewey has collected the high altitude thing from Ecuador also but to
my
        knowledge it is not still among the living.

    3. Rick's plant from Colombia, the thing that looks like a miniature
corrugatum, is      indeed the true Splendidum. It is not the same plant as
Dewey has now or the
        high altitude, long internoded thing from Ecuador. Believe me, I have
seen and
        collected the high altitude thing, and the one from Colombia that
Rick collected      and then I later collected. The one from
        Fairchild is a low altitude thing which might explain why it grows
well in South
        Florida. You might ask Fairchild what collecting information they
have on the
        one they have. That might clear up that mystery. But Dewey does have
the
        plant as Fairchild. It may just be that he is growing it much better.
Sometimes
        all of us get lucky.

        I do wish Dewey would chime in here and give us some of his stories
but
        perhaps he prefers to be quiet and listen to us banter back and forth
with a
        chuckle on his breath. If so, have fun Dewey. You have won the battle.

        Now, if mud is thin enough, perhaps it is time to let this Splendidum
thing
        rest until the paper comes out.

        I do know that there is a great need for herbarium specimen of the
leaf and
        the flower spike of that beautiful dark green thing we used to call
Splendidum.
        If anyone is willing to part with a couple of leaves and the spike,
they could
        send it to Tom and I know he would be very appreciative. Then just
maybe this
        paper could be completed and published. Just wishful thinking, but
what the
        heck.

        Until then or something else comes up, please ....... good growing

        Betsy







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