hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
Gallery of Plants
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Mailing Lists
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Alocasia cultivars

  • To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L <aroid-l@mobot.org>
  • Subject: Re: Alocasia cultivars
  • From: Ron Weeks <rhweeks@ibm.net>
  • Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2000 16:58:55 -0500 (CDT)


Alocasia "Portadora" and A. "Portora" are different selections from the
same A. portei x A. odora cross made by Larry Garner in the early
1980's. The name A. "xportora" is a typo for portora that I neglected to
correct. Larry chose the name "Portora". I believe the name "Portadora"
came from a California producer.

Larry wrote about his work in Hybridizing Alocasias for the Landscape,
Aroideana volume 6, number 3. Several photos are in The Cultivated
Alocasia, Aroideana volume 7, number 3-4.

I purchased many of the "Portora" and "Calidora" seedlings and grew them
out to make the best selection for tissue culture production. The plants
ranged from lance leaf miniatures to broadleaf giants. Petioles and
veins in A. Portora  went from reddish to a pale yellow. With the help
of Jim Georgusis two forms of A. Portora and one A. Calidora were
selected for TC production. Both A. Portora, a red and a green form, had
large, broad upright leaves and were strong growers. The green A.
Portora was dropped because landscapers either preferred the red form or
did not care.

Ron Weeks

 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index