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Re: AMORPHOPHALLUS @ Fairchild Tropical Garden


What about hybridizing Arisaema ???

- just to make confusion perfect.

I know, just a bad joke ...

Bjørn Malkmus


On 26 Apr 2000, at 16:55, Wilbert Hetterscheid wrote:
> The first person to distribute hybridised Amorphophalluses will have to
> watch his/her back for the rest of his/her life..................or must
> learn all twohundred REAL species by heart!!!!!
>
> Wilbert
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Scott Hyndman <hyndman@aroid.org>
>
> > Your idea is an interesting one, but keep in mind that without the
> > very careful documentation of proposed Amorphophallus hybrids, the
> > taxonomy could
> > become very confused, just as it is already in the many hybrids that
> > exist of Anthurium, Caladium, and Spathiphyllum.
> >
> > Regards,  Scott
> >
> > --------------------
> > Mr. Scott E. Hyndman
> > Vero Beach, Florida, USA
> > USDA Hardiness Zone 10a
> > E-mail:  <hyndman@aroid.org>
> >
> >
> > > From: "Bonaventure W Magrys" <magrysbo@shu.edu>
> > > Dear Craig,
> > > Anthurium, Spathiphyllum, Caladium, and Calla, are among aroid
> > > genera which have
> > > horticulturally benefited greatly from a program of hybridization
> > > and breeding. Now that you have several species of Amorphophallus
> > > and relatives blooming or ready to, together, howbout saving pollen
> > > from one and putting it on others when receptive, to produce hybrids?
> > > The benefits, at least, may turn out to be hybrid vigor and
> > > decreased maturation time. Many unexpected surprises turn up also.
> > > There would probably be a ready market for such seed or seedlings as
> > > many of us would be eager to grow up some of these..........
> > >
> > > Bonaventure W. Magrys
> > > Elizabeth, NJ  zone 6







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