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Re: Pentac (Floramite)

  • Subject: Re: Pentac (Floramite)
  • From: Denis <denis@skg.com>
  • Date: Wed, 25 Apr 2001 11:32:38 -0500 (CDT)

Floramite, despite its expensive price per pound it is used at 2 ounces
per hundred gallons of water and comes premeasured in one-ounce water
soluble packets in a one pound resealable foil pouch.  This is fairly
ideal for commercial grower who is spraying 50 to a 100 gallons at a
time in his shadehouse or greenhouse. One Pound is more than enough to
do my entire nursery. I don't know if they will ever come out with a
size suitable for hobbiests who would spray an occassional 5 gallons
with a hoze-on sprayer or a pump-up 2 gallon tank. 
The another new miticide out last year was Cinnamite, a derivative of
cinnamon oil I think. I understand it works well and makes your plants
smell wonderfultoo... but I elected not to use it because of the cost
per application in my nursery. As environmentally friendly that one is,
I would think that the hobbiest would like that one despite its price.

My standard spray for mites is a mixture of Avid,(a systemic neurotoxin)
and Azatin a derivative of the Neem tree oil. Both of these are not
inexpensive either.
 
Unfortunately, the ornamental horticulture industry is losing a lot of
the old stand-by pesticides due to environmental concerns. The new ones
that are coming out to take their place tend to be very expensive and
come with warnings that advise growers to not spray materials more often
than once per crop cycle to avoid building up resistant populations of
mites and insects. George, Perhaps being in Manila, Pentac might still
be available to you from your local farm chemical distributors. 

denis@skg.com
Silver Krome Gardens
Homestead Florida   

George Yao wrote:
> 
> Denis,
> 
> Thanks for the info. I checked out Hummert International and they don't
> have Floramite. But, I was able to locate sources via search engines, but,
> my, it is very expensive, ranging from $200 to $350 per lb. Of course, you
> can  make a lot of spray applications from it, but it will take years to
> finish 1 lb. for hobbyists like me. I wonder why they don't make it in
> hobbyist sizes?
> 
> George Yao <gcyao@netasia.net>
> Metro-Manila, Philippines
> 
> At 11:37 PM 4/23/01, you wrote:
> >Pentac used to be the standard industry spray for mites, but they
> >stopped making it. To my knowledge it is no longer available and has
> >been replaced in our spray rotation with something called Floramite from
> >Uniroyal Chemical. I am not sure where you would find this product on
> >line or in a catalog except through Hummert International(formerly
> >Hummert Seed) in St. Louis, Mo. Good luck.
> >
> >Denis at Silver Krome Gardens
> >Homestead Florida
> >
> >George Yao wrote:
> > >
> > > Is there an online source of Pentac?
> > >
> > > George Yao <gcyao@netasia.net>
> > > Metro-Manila, Philippines
> > >
> > > At 11:12 PM 4/19/01, you wrote:
> > > >Nyles,
> > > >
> > > >If you're searching for an aroid-friendly miticide, I'd suggest using
> > > >"Pentac".
> > > >Very safe as these things go, Pentac is mite specific and won't kill
> > > >beneficial
> > > >insects (it's an acaricide, not an insecticide).  It's slow acting
> > > >initially; treated
> > > >mites stop feeding in a few hours but don't die for 1 - 3 days.  Hence
> > Pentac
> > > >is optimally used in a preventative type program or when an infestation is
> > > >first
> > > >discovered.
> > > >
> > > >Obviously, your mite population has already become well established.
> > > >In this case you might consider mixing the Pentac directly with some other
> > > >product
> > > >exhibiting a faster knock-down; Pentac is compatible with all common
> > > >insecticides.
> > > >One aroid-safe product I can highly recommend is "Mavrik", a
> > > >synthetic-pyrethroid.
> > > >
> > > >Mix the two compounds together then add a spreader-sticker (now here's
> > a good
> > > >application for your failed Safer's soap!).  Follow up on days 5 and 10
> > > >with another
> > > >spraying and I can assure you: the pending apocalypse will be
> > > >unequivocally canceled.
> > > >At least until next season.
> > > >
> > > >Best of luck,
> > > >  -Dan Levin
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >Nyles wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Help!
> > > > >
> > > > > My Eastern Skunk Cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus) has a heavy spider
> > mite
> > > > > infestation.
> > > > > Can other aroids be far behind?
> > > > > Is this a sign of the apocalypse?
> > > > >
> > > > > I've been trying soap solutions.
> > > > > It's too heavy an infestation for predatory mites.
> > > > > It's very dry in Arizona, and some plants seem prone. This is a
> > first for
> > > > > the skunks.
> > > > >
> > > > > Help me!....anyone?
> > > > >
> > > > > Nyles





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