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Re: Soil mix and pine bark

  • Subject: Re: Soil mix and pine bark
  • From: "Cooper, Susan L." <SLCooper@scj.com>
  • Date: Wed, 3 Apr 2002 15:26:46 -0600 (CST)

Wow,
Thanks to everybody who pitched in with their knowledge and suggestions.  I
know this list has gone over the soil mix time and time again, and some
members may be bored, but not me!  

As thanks, here is my tip:
Dr. Mohammed Fayyaz of the University of Wisconsin- Madison planted some
Amorphophallus titanum seeds very shallowly, and then covered them with
silica sand.  He also planted some without covering them with the sand. He
told me the only ones that germinated were the ones covered with sand.

Dr. Mo has written a paper on the cultivation and flowering of "Big Bucky",
the 8ft 5inch inflor. which tied the "world record".  Hopefully this can be
published in either Aroideana or the newsletter in the future.  Mo is in
charge of the University greenhouses, and is an extremely enthusiastic
educator.

 

Susan 





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